Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

HPX Archives: --01

HPX: January - February 2014

Doody’s Farm (1698)

394 Foxon Road

North Branford

Located on Route 80 in North Branford, this historic farmstead is being marketed as a potential development site. Possibly the oldest house in North Branford, the site contains a 3 bedroom farmhouse and four outbuildings. The outbuildings have been photographed and included in the Connecticut Trust’s Historic Barns of Connecticut database (www.connecticutbarns.org). The property would likely qualify for listing on the Connecticut State Register of Historic Places. According to www.realtor.com, this is the first time the property has been made available for sale.

Contact: Dow Realty Company, 945 Grand Avenue, New Haven; (203) 776-0000 or email info@dowrealty.com.

Mill Building (1901)

501 Middle Turnpike East

Manchester

This building was historically known as the Glastonbury Knitting Mills when the mill produced men’s long woolen underwear at the beginning of the 20th century. By the 1920s, the garment had lost popularity leading to the close of the mill. The building has since seen service as an antique store, drug store, bar, printing plant, furniture store, shoe store, warehouse, bookshop, and is now available for redevelopment. Features include a great location on the Manchester Green with easy access to Main Street, Rt. 84 and Rt. 384; also brick masonry construction, tower with mansard roof, more than 30,000 square feet of space, high ceilings, wood flooring, and more. Rehabilitation may qualify for historic preservation tax credits.

Contact: Barry Cyr (860) 645-1776, office@condorealty.com

Barn (c. 1880)

Putnam

Large gentleman’s stable is available for relocation. Still standing, the barn measures 30’ x 40’ (plus cupola) and a 25’ x 30’ addition. Intact are the original horse stalls, flooring, decorative woodwork, tack closets with hardware, and wall sheathing. All woodwork has original, untouched painted surfaces.

Contact: William Gould Architectural Preservation, LLC at 860-974-3448 or visit the website http://historic-architecture.com/historicbarns.html.

Deadline for submissions to the March-April 2014 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is February 21, 2014.

HPX: November-December 2013

Sanford-Bristol House (1790)

Milford

On November 6, the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and the Milford Preservation Trust reached a settlement with the owners of the Sanford- Bristol house to prevent the house’s demolition. The settlement came as a result of a lawsuit filed under the Connecticut Environmental Protection Act.

The settlement gives the two Trusts until mid-January to find a new buyer who will complete the renovation of the house. After that, the Farrells may proceed with the demolition as approved. The asking price is $200,000 -- cash only.
 

Built in 1790, the Sanford- Bristol house is a contributing resource in the River Park National Register district. With its uncommon outline -- a gambrel roof in front and a lean-to in back -- it belongs to a small but distinctive group in Milford, likely the work of a single builder, or a reflection of local tastes. Renovation has been started but not completed; structural investigation indicates that the building is basically sound.

Contact: Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation if you are interested in viewing the home. Email: Milford@cttrust.org Phone: 203.562.6312

Naugatuck Train Station (1910)

195 Water Street

Naugatuck

A contributing resource to the Naugatuck Center National Register Historic District and owned by the Borough of Naugatuck, this Spanish Colonial Revival-style train station is available for redevelopment.  The station was designed by Henry Bacon (1866-1924), a major American architect.  Located on a still active rail line, the site offers great redevelopment potential.  Grants and federal and state historic preservation tax credits may apply.

Link to the National Register nomination: http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/99000859.pdf.

Contact: Naugatuck Economic Development Corporation at (203) 723-4411 or info@naugatuckedc.com.

Dreshner’s Restaurant (1903)

25 Leavenworth Street

Waterbury

Historic restaurant is available for purchase or lease.  Drescher's Restaurant, the city's oldest restaurant, closed nearly a year ago. Drescher's opened in 1868 and moved into its Leavenworth Street building in 1904.  The mahogany and oak bar was one a city landmark. For more information, see article published in the American-Republican (http://www.rep-am.com/articles/2013/09/16/news/local/750536.txt). The building is a contributing structure in the Downtown Waterbury National Register district and may be eligible for grants and federal and state historic preservation tax credits.

Contact: Drubner Commercial Real Estate in Waterbury at (203) 753-4116 or visit www.drubner.com.

Residence (1897)

194-198 Black Rock Avenue

Bridgeport

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Division Street Historic District, this multi-family residence is located in a good neighborhood about four blocks from the beach (Seaside Park).  The house is currently vacant and in foreclosure.  Investment in this property may qualify for the state Historic Homes Tax Credit program. (Link: http://www.cultureandtourism.org/cct/cwp/view.asp?a=3933&q=302270)

Contact: Carrington Real Estate Services, Joe Gruttadauria at (203) 732-8788.

Residence (1953)

3 Dogwood Lane

Darien

In danger of becomimg a teardown: this residence designed by Edward Durell Stone, friend of Frank Lloyd Wright, is currently for sale. Like Wright, Stone was inspired by Japanese architecture; the house’s warm wooden interior, shoji screens, and harmony with the landscape all reflect this influence.

Contact: Mary Lopiano at (203) 656-6566 or mlopiano@halstead.com.

Deadline for submissions to the January-February 2014 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is December 20, 2013.

September-October 2013

Kingsley-Havermeyer House

31 Whitney Avenue
New Haven

The historic Kingsley-Havermeyer House, a New Haven Landmark building, is up for sale.
Built in the 1850's the building boasts over 5,000 square feet of office space on three floors and a private 12-car parking lot.  The basement office has a separate, private entrance at the back of the building.  The building sits in the heart of the legal and office district on the edge of the Yale campus.
The building's third floor has a spacious two bedroom apartment, with a living room and a large eat-in kitchen.

Building is listed for $849,900. 
Contact: Steven Press at Press/Cuozzo Realtors  (203) 407-4698

Mansion House

Northeastern Connecticut

Mansion House was a term used in early land records when referring to a two-story dwelling.  This rare survivor, built by a very wealthy individual is a first period Connecticut two over two that epitomized the Mansion House, measuring 20’4” in depth x 46’10” in length.  The original portion is framed in oak, chestnut and pine, the longer timbers are hewn and the shorter timbers are mechanically sawn.  All the girts, plates and summers are beaded. There is 8’ feet clearance on both floors between the underside of the summers and the flooring.   The posts, straight on the first floor and shouldered on the second are chamfered with wind braces of at least 7’ feet long at every corner.  The first floor walls were originally filled with nogging.  The layout is asymmetric with the parlor and parlor chamber measuring 19’5” x 19’8” and the hall and hall chamber measuring 17’3” x 19’5” while the porch is 9’6” in width. The first period front stairway, dogleg to the left, retains its handrail and newel posts with a drop finial.  Original flooring exists on the second floor and in the attic.  Some four-panel doors 36” in width have survived along with a first period curved back corner cupboard.

The house was enlarged in circa 1830 by adding 12’ onto the rear making the new depth 32’4”.  In the process, a post and purlin frame was installed in the attic to support the reuse of the original rafters on the front side, in two pieces, and new one-piece rafters on the rear.  The original stone chimney was removed at the time of expansion and replaced with five brick fireplaces and a brick chimney through the roof.

The building is to be dismantled.

Contact: William Gould, William Gould Architectural Preservation, LLC at (860) 974-3448 or preservation1@mindspring.com.


Frederick Belden House (1855)
75 East Avenue
Norwalk

Available: An architectural gem in a very desirable business location facing west on the Norwalk Green.  Building may accommodate 1st floor commercial use and 3- bedroom apartment on the 2nd floor with a total of 5,492 sq ft finished area.  There is on-site parking for 14 cars with additional street parking along Bettswood available.  This historic building was most recently used as a funeral parlor. Potential alternate uses include attorney, CPA, and doctor’s offices plus residential uses.  Listed as the “Frederick Belden House” on the National Register of Historic Places, it is a contributing resource in the Norwalk Green Historic District.  Restoration/rehabilitation of the property may qualify for state or federal tax credits.

Contact: Ray Rumer (203) 899-3230 or rayrumer@bhhsNE.com. Listing details can be found at Prudential's website.

Submissions for the November-December 2013 issue must be received by Friday, October 25, 2013.

HPX: May/ June 2013

Historic Properties Exchange
May – June 2013


TWO OPPORTUNITIES IN SOUTH WINDSOR


1146 Main Street (c.1850)
South Windsor


Currently under threat of demolition, this property is available for consideration with the option of rehabilitation on site or relocation (preferably within the Windsor Farms district).  The Town of South Windsor's Demolition Delay Committee (DDC) voted to delay approval of a demolition permit for 1146 Main Street and agreed to work with the home's owners to reach a mutually agreeable solution that would preserve the structure.

The handsome Greek Revival house is framed by corner pilasters and a pedimented gable that make it a shorthand version of an ancient Greek temple. The chunky, square moldings give it strong geometry and a dignified presence on the street. It is currently a multi-family dwelling with 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms in approximately 2,490 total square feet.  Photos show a side porch which may no longer exist.

An excerpt of the statement of significance of the Windsor Farms Historic District as noted in the National Register nomination:
The Windsor Farms Historic District, the historic center of South Windsor, is a well preserved, rural-residential community of great historic significance. It is one of the few farming villages remaining in Connecticut still devoted to tobacco agriculture.  Unlike the more typical historic rural areas of the state where the historic components are widely scattered, the Windsor Farms Historic District is a highly concentrated, cohesive entity. Not only does it contain a significant group of farmhouses, barns, and other specialized buildings related to tobacco agriculture, it also encompasses approximately 1,500 acres of contiguous historic farmland which has been under intensive cultivation for more than 300 years. In addition to the more than 50 tobacco barns or sheds, the district contains well-preserved examples of major domestic building types and styles dating from 1694 to 1930, including a particularly fine, representative group of nineteenth-century houses built in the Greek Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne, and Colonial Revival styles.

A Connecticut Trust Circuit Rider is working to gather some of critical information about the condition of the house and the possible cost of remediation.  In the meantime, the DDC asks for assistance in identifying individuals or organizations that might have an interest in rehabilitation of the house.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org.

John Watson House (1788)
1876 Main Street
South Windsor

Former bed and breakfast (9 bedrooms, 8 full bathrooms) located in the East Windsor Hill historic district is available for purchase. Master builder Thomas Hayden designed and built this three-story mansion for John Watson, a prominent merchant. Description of the property from the National Register of Historic Places nomination:

Sited prominently at the northeast corner of Main Street and Sullivan Road, this three-story, wood-frame Georgian/Federal-Style mansion is a commanding presence. The heavy modillions under the eaves and the massiveness of the house contrast with the delicacy of the pedimented entranceway and the classical treatment of the central facade bay with its tripartite windows. A remarkable feature of this house is the use of a formal entrance on all four elevations. They are virtually identical with a pediment and fanlight, although only the main doorway has sidelights.

To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov and search East Windsor Hill Historic District, South Windsor, Connecticut.  Outbuildings on the site: carriage house, garage and outhouse.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org.


Submissions for the July-August 2013 issue must be received by Friday, June 21, 2013.

HPX: March/ April 2013

Historic Properties Exchange
March - April 2013


John Watson House (1788)
1876 Main Street
South Windsor

Former bed and breakfast (9 bedrooms, 8 full bathrooms) located in the East Windsor Hill historic district is available for purchase. Master builder Thomas Hayden designed and built this three-story mansion for John Watson, a prominent merchant. Description of the property from the National Register of Historic Places nomination:

Sited prominently at the northeast corner of Main Street and Sullivan Road, this three-story, wood-frame Georgian/Federal-Style mansion is a commanding presence. The heavy modillions under the eaves and the massiveness of the house contrast with the delicacy of the pedimented entranceway and the classical treatment of the central facade bay with its tripartite windows. A remarkable feature of this house is the use of a formal entrance on all four elevations. They are virtually identical with a pediment and fanlight, although only the main doorway has sidelights.

To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov and search East Windsor Hill Historic District, South Windsor, Connecticut.  Outbuildings on the site: carriage house, garage and outhouse.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org


Southford Chapel (c. 1830)
19 Strongtown Road (intersection of Rt. 67 & 188)
Southbury 

A demolition request was filed for this structure in December 19, 2012 and is nearing the end of its 90-day delay of demolition period.  Historically known as “Union Church” the Southford Chapel is one of the most significant buildings in Southford, according to Mary McCahon in the State of Connecticut Historic Resources Inventory. “Standing at a major crossroad in the former industrial village, the church is one of a handful of buildings that convey the sense of community now that the mills and factories that stimulated development of the area have disappeared.”

Contact: Baldwin Realty LLC of 331 B, Heritage Village, Southbury, Connecticut 06488 or Deloris Curtis, Southbury Planning Department, planning@southbury-ct.gov.
   

Lighthouse Inn (1902)
6 Guthrie Place
New London 

After sitting vacant for four years, Lighthouse Inn Resort in New London is available for purchase and restoration.  On Tuesday, March 19, CBRE Auction Services will present the inn for online auction opening bids at $500,000. The beautiful Lighthouse Inn is a historic, 100+year old former estate located on Long Island Sound. The Mission style inn was designed by renowned architect William R. Emerson to be the summer residence of steel magnate Charles S. Guthrie.  Original landscaping at the inn was designed by Olmsted Brothers, of Brookline, Massachusetts. About 25 years after its construction, the property became a popular seaside hotel boasting 51 guest rooms, restaurant and other amenities; it was formerly one of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Historic Hotels of America.
This property, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, may be eligible for historic preservation tax credits.  To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov  and search Lighthouse Inn, New London, Connecticut.  For more information about the auction, go to:  http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/18026294/6-GUTHRIE-PLACE-New-London-CT/ .

14 Sturtevant Ave
Norwich, CT 06360


Foreclosure property being sold “as is.” Spacious two-family home in decent condition boasting a finished attic and unique Victorian features. Seller may contribute up to 3% towards owner occupied buyers closing costs. Built in 1901, and located in the Chelsea Parade National Register district, the house may qualify for historic preservation tax credits.  For more information, go to: http://www.coldwellbankermoves.com/property/details/3162252/MLS-M9136453/14-Sturtevant-Ave-Norwich-CT-06360.aspx.
51 Greene Ave
Norwich, CT 06360
This 1890 Victorian multi-family home is located within walking distance to downtown. Located in the Chelsea Parade National Register district, the house may qualify for historic preservation tax credits.  For more information, go to: http://www.coldwellbankermoves.com/property/details/3330549/MLS-E263786/51-Greene-Ave-Norwich-CT-06360.aspx.
80 Asylum St
Norwich, CT 06360
Extra large, c. 1860 multi-family residence is available for purchase and rehabilitation. Building Code violations need to be addressed.  Sale is “as is” with no junk removal or repairs to be done by seller. For more information, go to: http://www.coldwellbankermoves.com/property/details/3258274/MLS-E262311/80-Asylum-St-Norwich-CT-06360.aspx.


Submissions for the March- April 2013 issue must be received by Friday, April 26, 2013.

HPX: January/ February 2013

Historic Properties Exchange
January – February 2013


Andrews-Olney House (c. 1800)
Southington

Currently owned by the Southington YMCA and under temporary injunction preventing demolition until January 2013, the Andrews-Olney House on North Main Street is available for purchase and rehabilitation. The property is located in the Southington Center National Register District and identified as a contributing resource. It offers an opportunity for residential or commercial uses. Non-profit organizations interested in the property may qualify for pre-development planning grants from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and restoration funds from the State Historic Preservation Office/Department of Economic and Community Development.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider, (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org


John Watson House (1788)
1876 Main Street

Former bed and breakfast (9 bedrooms, 8 full bathrooms) located in the East Windsor Hill historic district is available for purchase. Thomas Hayden designed and built this three-story mansion for John Watson, a prominent merchant. Description of the property from the National Register of Historic Places nomination:

Sited prominently at the northeast corner of Main Street and Sullivan Road, this three-story, wood-frame Georgian/Federal-Style mansion is a commanding presence. The heavy modillions under the eaves and the massiveness of the house contrast with the delicacy of the pedimented entranceway and the classical treatment of the central facade bay with its tripartite windows. A remarkable feature of this house is the use of a formal entrance on all four elevations. They are virtually identical with a pediment and fanlight, although only the main doorway has sidelights.

To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov and search East Windsor Hill Historic District, South Windsor, Connecticut.  Outbuildings on the site: carriage house, garage and outhouse.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org


Gideon Seeley House (ca. 1812)
Brookfield

This early 19th century vernacular cottage was owned by several of Brookfield's prominent families and has been occupied throughout its history. It has had some additions over the years including architectural details that date from the Victorian period on both the interior and exterior. It measures approximately 1,825 square feet and is available for relocation and rehabilitation to interested parties.

Contact:  Jacqueline A. Salame, AIA
(203) 775-2538
tourdeforcedesigns@charter.net


Cohanzie School (1923)
40, 44, 48 Dayton Road
Waterford

Last call for proposals to rehabilitate the former Cohanzie School in Waterford.  Designed by local architect Louis H. Goddard and contractor Joseph A. St. Germain in 1923, the school on its 11-acre site was added to the Connecticut State Register of Historic Places in June 2012 making it a candidate for possible tax credits and grants.  Located near the Crystal Mall.

Contact: Robert N. Nye, Town Clerk & Municipal Historian (860) 444-5829 or clerk@waterfordct.org


Memorial Boulevard School
Bristol 

The City of Bristol is accepting sealed responses related to the reuse of the property known as Memorial Boulevard Middle School. Sealed responses will be accepted by the Purchasing Department, on behalf of the Real Estate Committee of the City Council, until February 1, 2013 at 1:00 pm. The City reserves the right to waive informalities in proposals, and to accept any or all proposals, if in its judgment the best interests of the City will be served. Further information can be obtained online at the website below.

Contact:  The City of Bristol
Purchasing Department
111 North Main Street
Bristol, CT 06010
     Tel (860) 584-6195, Fax (860) 584-6171
     http://www.bristolct.gov/bids, http://www.ci.bristol.ct.us/DocumentCenter/View/1333


Curtiss Farms barn
Plantsville/Southington 

Barn available for dismantling and removal from the property.  See listing in the Historic Barns of Connecticut statewide survey at http://www.connecticutbarns.org/index.cgi/52393.

Contact: Bill Curtiss (518) 439-3921, wcurtiss@aol.com, or Scott Curtiss (860)302-0314, SACurtiss@cox.net

Submissions for the March- April 2013 issue must be received by Friday, February 22, 2013.

Historic Properties Exchange

Historic Properties Exchange is published to advertise endangered historic properties in Connecticut by the Connecticut Trust, a statewide nonprofit organization located at 940 Whitney Avenue, Hamden, CT 06517.  Real Estate advertised is subject to the Federal Housing Act of 1968. Neither advertisers nor the Connecticut Trust are responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors contained in Historic Properties Exchange

To list a property, to learn more about the properties listed, or to subscribe to Connecticut Preservation News contact Jane Montanaro, Preservation Services Officer at jmontanaro@cttrust.org or 203-562-6312.


Historic Properties Exchange is supported by a generous grant from Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects.


Smith-Curtiss House, Derby, and Worthen Property, Granby

The Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) would like to announce that the Request for Proposals for the Smith-Curtiss property in Derby and the Worthen property in Granby will be available beginning April 1, 2011, at www.ct.gov/dep/residentcurator.

The Smith-Curtiss house, a classic saltbox built between 1740 and 1780, with additions in mid-19th century and early 20th century, is located in Osbornedale State Park in Derby. The house is approximately 2,300 sq. ft. with a detached two-car garage.

The Worthen property, a cape-style house built circa 1820 with later additions, is located in Enders State Forest in Granby. It is approximately 2,650 sq. ft. with a detached 1,300 sq ft. barn/guesthouse.

The Resident Curator Program invites individuals, families, businesses, and nonprofit organizations to apply for a long-term lease in one of these historic homes. In lieu of rent, the Resident Curator funds the restoration and the routine maintenance of the home and is required to provide public programming on the property that enhances visitor experiences while in the park or forest. The Resident Curator Program is modeled after similar successful ventures in Massachusetts, Maryland, and Delaware state parks, where historic structures, parks, and the public have benefited from restoration of these properties. Resident curators have the unique opportunity to live in a state park or forest and to play a key role in the preservation of state and local history.

The Request for Proposals will be available for free download on the website: www.ct.gov/dep/residentcurator.

Contact: Nicole Chalfant, nicole.chalfant@ct.gov or (860) 424-3179.

 

Branford, Puppet House Theater

Puppet House Theater

128-132 Thimble Islands RoadBranford 

The Puppet House Theater, a beloved Stony Creek/Thimble Islands National Register Historic District landmark, is available for sale.  Constructed ca. 1895 as a silent movie house, the site has had a long history as a performance space for community theater groups, professional summer stock, local bands, artists, and, more recently, the famous Sicilian Puppets of Sebastiano Zappala. During WWII, however, the building was transformed for a time to accommodate a different kind of production: factory production of parachutes to aid the war effort.  Two properties on the site are being sold together as one: #128, Puppet House Theater building (2,813 SF) and #132, a multi-purpose building (598 SF).  The property has potential for commercial and/or residential reuse. 

Contact: Joel Gavin, GRI CCS, Senior Commercial Associate               

H. Pearce Commercial Real Estate                

393 State Street               

North Haven, CT  06473               

(203) 281-9321               

jgavin@hpearce.com

One-room schoolhouse, Salem

  

One-room schoolhouse

Salem 

This one-room Oakdale schoolhouse is available for relocation.  The property is one of 8 one-room schoolhouses in the area. This schoolhouse was in service until about 1939 when the town constructed a modern school.  A saltbox with a lot of charm, it has been used for the last 20 years as an herbery and for flower arranging.  Structure is 24ft wide by 15ft long and in good condition.  Own a piece of history for a low price!  Best offer.  Buyer must demonstrate ability to remove structure from the site and reconstruct it on a new site. 

Contact: Angela Murawski at (860) 859-2034 or dxlxm@aol.com

Laurel Lodge, Westport

Photo credit: Lampel Photography 

Laurel Lodge was designed in 1912 by noted Architect John Vredenburgh Van Pelt (1874-1962) at the peak of the Arts and Crafts movement. Commanding 2.3 acres directly on the Saugatuck River it has sweeping views of the Long Island Sound. The master bedroom, called the "Japanese Room," is a small masterpiece with an original suite of custom-made furniture.  The fervent teardown culture in Westport, (go to www.WestportNow.com “Tear Down of the Day” for a sampling), poses a real threat to his desirable waterfront property.  Michael Glynn Architects has prepared a detailed restoration budget to aid interested buyers.  Asking price: $4.995 million. 

Contact: Emily Gordon atColdwell Banker / Riverside, 472 Riverside Avenue Westport, CT  06880Cell: (203) 451-6432, Office: (203) 227-8427.

Old Schoolhouse, Enfield

Photo Courtesy of the Enfield Historical Society 

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS FORTHE DISPOSITION OF THE FORMER SCHOOLHOUSE

LOCATED AT 2 BROAD BROOK ROAD, ENFIELD, CT

Sealed proposals for the disposition named above will be received at the Office of the Director of Finance until 10:00 a.m., Wednesday, March 16, 2011.  Thereafter, proposals will be opened in public and read aloud. Specifications and proposal documents may be obtained from the Office of the Town Manager, Town Hall, 820 Enfield Street, Enfield, CT 06082, telephone number (860) 253-6351 or the Town's website, www.enfield-ct.gov.  The Town of Enfield reserves the right to accept or reject any, all, or any part of proposals, to waive formalities or informalities and to award the proposal deemed to be in the best interests of the Town. Lynn Nenni, Director of FinanceEOE/AA

Barn (c. 1900), Southbury

 Barn located at 672 Strongtown Road is available for relocation.  Salvage is not an option. Parties must demonstrate ability to dismantle the barn and rebuild it on their own site. Barn will be available for approximately 6 weeks. Interested parties should contact the owner immediately. Available for: $1.00. To view more information on this barn in the Connecticut Trust’s survey of Connecticut Barns, go to http://www.connecticut barns.org and search “Southbury” then “Strongtown Road.” 

Contact: Jonathan Turner (203) 359-7657

HPX: Nov/Dec 2010 - Potsdam Village houses, Coltsville (Hartford)

Potsdam Village houses, Coltsville

Located across from Colt Park, these four well-maintained properties include a single family home (built in 1847), two 2-family homes on one lot (built in 1834 and 1900, respectively), a .63 acre vacant lot (the site of the Potsdam Village Community Center in the mid-1800s) and another 2-family home (built 1866). 

National Register of Historic Places Inventory – Nomination Form written in 1978 by George R. Adams, vividly describes these houses.

Potsdam Cottages…are built in a half- timbered, or modified chalet style, supposedly reminiscent of the vernacular style of the German hamlet from which Colt imported nearly 40 craftsmen.  Some of these nine have been somewhat disguised by modern siding, yet all retain their original shape and profile.  The best have exposed first story red brick walls set into half timber framing joined by wooden pegs.  The buildings are one and a half stories with gabled roof.  They all originally had exterior stairways with porches on both levels and a small balcony outside the second story window on the gable end.  The second story was covered with vertical board and batten clapboarding which was painted white.  The wide overhanging eaves, as well as the windows were trimmed in typical 19th century woodwork patterns.

The four properties are offered as a package at $400,000 or may be purchased individually.  Currently, the seven apartments provide a below market monthly income of $3,550. The properties are located at 41 & 45 Curcombe Street and 65, 73 & 75 Hendricxsen Avenue.

Purchase this unique piece of Hartford history and join the effort to restore historic Coltsville, the neighborhood leading the revitalization of Hartford.

 

Contact:  Maria Hagan, Prudential Connecticut Realty, (860)571-6626, mhagan@prudentialct.com.

 

Henry Reed House, 83 Great Hill Road, North Branford

The Henry Reed House was moved from an unknown location in the area of Lake Gaillard by the New Haven Water Company after it acquired the property in 1923. The house is an early-twentieth-century wood-framed rectangular structure on a fieldstone foundation, faced with local sandstone blocks. The original first-floor sid­ing may still be under the asbestos shingling. The only style-conscious feature is the Colonial Revival porch that is supported by Doric columns and capped with a low-pitched hipped roof. The inside layout of the house is very simple, with four rooms on each floor. Woodwork and hardware are well preserved throughout the house. Behind the house stands a one-and-a-half story barn with well-preserved animal stalls. The house and barn are offered for $1 each for relocation to a new property. Contact: Dawn O’Connell, H. Pearce Real Estate. (203) 281-3400, ext. 333.

Angelo Forte House, 714 Foxon Road, North Branford

Beginning in 1914, a number of Italian immigrants moved from New Haven to live in Branford and work for the New Haven Trap Rock Company. One of them was Angelo Forte, who built this one-and-a-half story bungalow around 1925. It has brown-stained wooden shingles with white trim and has an asphalt shingle roof. The house has a central doorway to an enclosed porch, which is the full width of the house. There are four main rooms on the first floor, with a small laundry room and bathroom. The second floor consists of several small bedrooms and a bathroom, arranged around a central, open area. One bedroom opens onto a sec-ond-story porch. This house is offered for $1 for relocation to a new property. Contact: Dawn O’ Connell, H. Pearce Real Estate. 203-281-3400, ext. 333.

Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding

This vernacular two-story house is linked to the history of Irish immigration. It was the home of Patrick and Kathryn Qualey, who sought a better life in Connecticut.  They built and tended a modest farmstead on seven acres and raised their family there. Members of the Qualey family occupied the house into the 1940s.  The adjacent Redding Country Club now owns the property and is offering to give away the house and two barns, if removed for restoration on another site. The buildings may be obtained and moved separately, however it would be desirable for them to retain their historical association with one another.The house is oriented with the gable end to the street. Brackets support a shallow pitched roof over the front door, which is centered on the facade. The house is of post and beam construction and has clapboard siding. The window sashes are one-over-one. Much of the original plaster remains on the interior walls, and the ceilings are seven feet high on both floors. The barns are also of post and beam construction.  The larger one has some roof damage.  The timeliness of proposals is important. The Country Club may contribute to moving costs for the right applicant. Contact: Michael Sautkulis, 203-938-2567.

Fisherman’s Shed, Groton

This small building was constructed in the early 1900s, sometime before 1920, and served as a shed for a lobster business on the waterfront. The current owner needs to have it moved off the property in order to build a house and would prefer not to demolish the shed. It is in very good condition. Wood shingles sheath the exterior in the tradition of many seaside buildings. The shed originally had a wood shingle roof as well, but it has since been replaced with asphalt shingles. The building measures approximately twelve feet by sixteen feet and sits on a stone foundation. Inside it has wood floors and a small loft, which is accessible by ladder. A brick chimney served a wood or coal-burning stove. The shed has one window on each of its four sides. It would be relatively easy to move and would work well as a garden shed or guest cottage.Contact number: 860-536-6523.

Daniel Chapman House, Redding

This eighteenth-century house of a Revolutionary War patriot needs to be moved or it will face demolition. Daniel Chapman, a soldier in the American Revolution, built the house in 1773, the year he got married. Four years later, British troops under the command of General Tryon captured him as they marched through Redding during the 1777 Raid on Danbury. He died in prison in New York City in the Sugar House, where many patriots lost their lives to disease and exposure to cold. Chapman left a young widow and an infant son behind in this house in Redding.

Chapman was from a family of early settlers of Connecticut in the seventeenth century. He had the same name as his grandfather, who was the founding minister of the Congregational Church in the Greens Farms section of what is now Westport.

The one-and-a-half story house is of post and beam construction with a hand-hewn timber frame. It has a fieldstone foundation and a center chimney of brick. Painted wood shingles sheath the exterior. The original windows have been replaced.

The present owner of the house may make a contribution to moving costs. Contact: Raymond D’Angelo, chairman Redding Preservation Society, 203-938-0240.

Historic Prison Cells, Coventry/Wethersfield

Now in the custody of the Coventry Police Department, these two cells survive from the Wethersfield state prison. The facility opened in 1827 when 81 prisoners were transferred from Newgate Prison, which still exists as a state-owned museum. The Wethersfield prison closed in 1963 and was demolished two years later. A concerned citizen arranged for the cells to be rescued. The date 1827 appears above the cell door, which may denote the date of construction. However, at least one local historian contends that the cells are made of steel, which did not exist in 1827. They may have been installed when the prison was upgraded around the turn of the twentieth century. In any event, they are more than 100 years old.

As would be expected in a jail cell, the dimensions are cramped (eight feet by five-and-a-half feet). A thick sheet of metal pierced with rows of eight point stars form the stationary part of the front wall. A sliding door made of bars allows entry. The cells are outfitted with iron bunks hanging from chains. Historically, they would have contained folding cots.

Amy Archer-Gilligan served time in one such cell in Wethersfield. She was convicted of one murder, but was widely believed to have poisoned several residents of her Windsor old-age home with arsenic. Her story, reportedly, inspired Joseph Kesselring’s well-known play "Arsenic and Old Lace." The Coventry Police are scheduled to move to a new police station. Chief of Police Beau Thurnauer would like to see the prison cells preserved in a location where their historical value could be showcased. Whoever takes the cells would be responsible for their removal and transportation. Contact: Chief Beau Thurnauer, Coventry Police Department, bthurnauer@coventryct.org or 860-742-7331.

HPX July/Aug 2010 - 200 Litchfield Street, Torrington

200 Litchfield Street, Torrington 

Circa 1900 mill style buildings are situated on approximately 3.20 acres in a central downtown Torrington location. The property consists of three facilities with nearly 79,000 interior SF available.  Features include steel and masonry construction with soaring ceiling heights, drive-in doors & loading docks.  Property is zoned general business and is part of the newly formed “Enterprise Zone”. Offered for $1,300,000.

Contact: Sullivan Real Estate, 860-738-1902, Kelly@sullivanreo.com.

HPX July/Aug 2010 - 30 Lawton Road, Canton

30 Lawton Road, Canton  

Jane’s favorite! Situated on 2.1 acres just off Rt. 44, this landmark 1786 stone house contains many original details throughout.  Wide chestnut flooring, eight fireplaces, wainscoting, five bedrooms, third floor ballroom, greenhouse, stonewalls, five car garage, and more. A real beauty!  To view photos online, search MLS#G535276.  Offered for $599,900.

 Contact: Pia Ciccone, 860-675-0646 (Home Office) or 860-573-4026 (Mobile

Roxbury Station, Roxbury

Commercial zoning and high property values are endangering a group of historic buildings on the scenic Shepaug River in the rural Town of Roxbury. As the only commercially-zoned area in the community, the complex known as Roxbury Station has attracted the interest of developers who want to tear down the buildings. However, reuse of the structures would result in an appealing retail complex taht would fit into the picturesque surroundings along Route 67, a state-designated Scenic Road.

Roxbury Station was a stop on the Shepaug Railroad, which was completed in 1872. The line ran from the Hawleyville section of Newtown to Litchfield. In the book Country Depots in the Connecticut Hills, Robert F. Lord and his co-authors say, "The Shepaug Railroad made a host of friends and very little money as it wound its way through the beautiful Litchfield hills." After struggling to maintain its autonomy through two foreclosures and reorganizations, the railroad became part of the New York, New Haven & Hartford system in 1898. It then ran for 50 more years. Although the Shepaug Railroad wrestled with its own finances in the nineteenth century, it was a boon to a number of industries in Roxbury including quarrying, dairy, and beef.

Today, the depot appears to be in good condition and retains quite a bit of authenticity. It has lost its platform, but retains original six-over-six windows, as well as loading doors. It has vertical-board siding. One end of the building was used for freight and the other for passenger service. Where the present monochrome beige color scheme has chipped slightly, the building shows evidence of red paint with white trim from its days as a working railroad stations.

Behind the depot, built into a rise in the land, stands a large nineteenth-century warehouse. It has vertical board siding on the front and clapboard on the side. An elevated porch with a second floor entry, which appears in historic photos, is located at the northeast end of the front facade. The building has two main floors and an attic. Tracks used to run between this building and the depot.

Across a small road that runs perpendicular to Route 67 (Mine Hill), there is a nineteenth-century general store, now adapted as a residence, which is also for sale as part of the complex. This building predates the railroad. In addition, the three-and-a-half acre parcel includes a large, long lumber shed and a barn. The Shepaug River borders the property and flows over a low dam, creating a scenic waterfall.

The listing agent, Bonnie Bevans, has a love for her childhood hometown of Roxbury and hopes to find a buyer who will preserve the buildings. She is also willing to organize a consortium of interested people to buy the property and adapt the buildings for appropriate commercial uses. She would contribut $10,000 of her own money to the effort, if others would join her.

Price: $2,200,000. Contact: Bonnie Bevans, William Raveis International, 860-488-3624.

HPX -  March/April 2009- Jonathan Wilcox House, 370 Boston Post Road, Madison

This 1770 Saltbox sits directly on the 14th fairway of theMadison Country Club. The building has been vacant for more than four years andhas a leaky roof. The house has recently been put on the market and the fear isthe cost of renovations will outweigh the character of the building in favor ofa demolition.

 

Contact: ToddGould, William Pitt Sotheby's International Realty, 203.738.0237 or  tgould@wpsir.com

HPX: January/February 2007, 18 Old Farm Road, Darien

This 18th century farmhouse in Tokeneke (Darien) on 1.76 acres of prime land. It is one of the original four homes built in Tokeneke. The property is bordered by stone walls. The interior boasts exposed beams and original wide plank floors. It has an exquisite new master bath and a playroom above the garage/barn.

http://dar.mlxchange.com/Pub/EmailView.asp?r=1232375333&s=DAR&t=DAR

Contact: Leslie Caruso at lcaruso@WheelerRealEstateCT.com

Listed: $2,175,000

HPX - September/October 2008 - Osborn House, 909 King’s Highway West, Southport

Individually listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, the Captain John Osborn House sits among other historic houseson rural King's Highway West, a section of the road between New York and Bostonthat was used for monthly mail service as early as 1672.  The originalcore of the house, dating from the late 1680s, is two-over-two rooms, witha central chimney on the ground floor.  Built in compatible style, twonewer wings with a modern kitchen and bedrooms, date from the 1950s. Historic homes like this are always in danger of demolition due to the desirabilityof the lot, especially in FairfieldCounty.

Contact:  HopeR. Kern, GRI (203) 259-5048 or Mike DeLorenzo, GRI, CRS (203) 218-2719 atMunson Real Estate or hrkern@optonline.net

HPX Sept/Oct 2007- Carriage Barn, Berlin

Berlin, Carriage Barn 

This early 20 century carriage barn is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. It has tongue and groove sheathing, a brick and field stone foundation and is interesting because it is built on a bank, which is rare for carriage barns. The barn’s roof is in disrepair and the floors have some rot, spurring the owner to try to find a new home for the building.

Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the barn from the site and reconstruct it on their own lot.

Contact: Roy Wiseman rwiseman@wesleyan.edu or 860-828-3563.   

HPX Sept/Oct 2007-Pratt-Stannard House, Westbrook

Pratt-Stannard House
Westbrook (c. 1790)

This center chimney cape-style house, constructed in the last quarter of the 18th century, is located on a quiet cul-de-sac near the Menunketesuck River adjacent to 20 acres of undeveloped land being considered for incorporation into the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge.

The antique house is in untouched condition and has nine rooms, three fireplaces, and original 18th century woodwork, as well fine early 19th century woodwork from the Greek Revival period. The first floor kitchen retains the majority of its 18th century elements, including the hearth, bake oven, and the decorative fireplace surround.  The rear of the house features an early 20th century ell that offers the potential for renovation as a modern kitchen or a master suite.

 The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and the National Trust for Historic Preservation recently supported professional structural and historical studies of the house that will aid future buyers in planning for preservation and restoration of the building. 

The Pratt-Stannard house will be sold with 2 acres of surrounding land.   For more information, contact Alicia Betty or Lisa Bassani at The Trust for Public Land, (203)-777-7367.

HPX Sept/Oct 2007- 18th Century Farmhouse, Fairfield

18th century farmhouse in Fairfield

This 1769 vernacular Georgian-period farmhouse located at 3808 Redding Road in upper Greenfield Hill has three fireplaces and 1 ½ baths. It includes 18 acres of subdividable land. Although the house is being marketed as a teardown, this is an excellent opportunity to restore an 18th century home and profit from development. The house and out-buildings are being sold "as is." Soil and perc test are available.

Contact: Krista Alecia 203-610-3550

List: $1,650,000

http://higginsgroup.idxre.com/idx/detail.cfm?cid=4591&bid=20&pid=98330758 

HPX: January/February 2007, Seth Wetmore House, Middletown

This elegant and imposing mansion was built in 1746 on a hillside site with views to Middletown and the Connecticut River. Wetmore was a successful merchant, judge and landowner, and his house boasts decorative details found in the homes of many of the Connecticut Valley elite known as the “River Gods.” On the outside, an impressive scroll-pedimented doorway dominates the facade. Indoors, the painted parlor, one of the great treasures of American decorative art, was removed to the Wadsworth Atheneum in 1988 and replaced with a replica, but other historic interiors remain, boasting wide-planked floors, fine paneling, an ornate stair and 8 fireplaces. The house is individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places, making it potentially eligible for federal rehabilitation tax credits.

The Wetmore house offers over 7,000 square feet, with 10 bedrooms, 3 full baths and 2 kitchens. Its generous size and proximity to Wesleyan University, make a bed-and-breakfast a possible reuse option. Though livable, the house needs extensive repairs, and the Connecticut Trust listed it in 2003 as one of the Most Important Threatened Historic Places in Connecticut.

With its exceptional architectural quality, the Wetmore house has the potential to be one of Connecticut's historic showplaces.

Contact: Betsy Purtell 203-640-4440 or BPurtell@coldwellbankermoves.com

Listed: $335,900

HPX: March/April 2007, Gazebo in Willington

19th Century Gazebo for Museum or Nonprofit Organization  Estate heirs are seeking to donate a late 19th century gazebo to a museum, historical organization or related nonprofit. Consideration will also be given to a town for use on a green or similar public space.  Accepting organization will be responsible for all moving and restoration costs and for maintenance expenses. The gazebo is to be donated with the agreement that it is for public use and is not to be sold to a private party. A letter of commitment is requested by June 30, 2007.  New property owners are allowing until July 31st for removal, but may provide a brief extension if needed. 

 In its current condition, the gazebo was appraised as a $10,000 donation with a replacement value of approximately $25,000. That value will increase once restoration is complete. Moving and restoration will cost approximately $50,000. The original roof finial is in storage until a suitable recipient is found for the structure. 

The gazebo was part of a residential complex in Willington, Connecticut, built between 1880 – 1895. It included a two story dwelling, barn, carriage house and other outbuildings.  The gazebo was over the well and stood at the end of the driveway, along Route 32. The shingles on the gazebo roof are the same style as those that were on the front side of the carriage house/barn. 

Between 1965 and 1969 the State of Connecticut Highway Department widened a section of Route 32 adjacent to the property. As a result the house and carriage house/barn were destroyed. The gazebo and its original grey granite foundation were moved a few hundred feet north to the current location. When the structure was restored in 1976 the name Louis A. Pettie was found under the roof shingles. It is not known if this was the original 19th century builder or the name of a carpenter from a later restoration or repair. 

Photos of the gazebo and related 19th century buildings are available, as well as photos of the move in 1968 and the restoration in 1976. They will be digitized and made available to the organization taking the gazebo. Also, State Highway Department maps should show the structures in their original location. 

All inquiries should be sent to Loretta Rivers at lrivers@lojeriproductions.org; telephone 860-291-0180. 

HPX: March/April 2007, Citizen’s Block Redevelopment, Vernon

The Town of Vernon is accepting proposals for the purchase and redevelopment of property known as Citizens’ Block building located at 28-36 Park Place in the Rockville section of Vernon. 

The Citizens Block is a stone building located on a corner in the center of Downtown Rockville facing Central Park, bordered on both sides by 19th-century buildings of similar style, scale and period of construction which interrelates visually in a harmonious way.  It provides a period example of the use of Italianate architectural features on a mid-19th century commercial/ residential block. The building is comprised of 15,000 square feet, three to four first floor commercial storefronts, and apartment/office locations on the second and third floor. This building was constructed in 1879 by Builder John G. Bailey, and Architect S.W. Lincoln of Hartford, CT and is a contributing structure to the Rockville National Register of Historic Places District.

 Interested individuals and firms should request a copy of the Qualifications Statement and Project Details from the Town Administrator, Town of Vernon, 14 Park Place, Vernon , CT 06066.  The Town reserves the right to reject any and all proposals or cancel this procurement at any time it is deemed in the best interest of the Town.

The Town will conduct a pre-proposal informational meeting and site walk on March 22, 2007 at 10:00 AM, at the Vernon Senior Center Lobby, Park Place, Vernon.

The submission deadline will be 11 AM on Thursday, March 29, 2007  

HPX July/August 2008 108 Oxford Road, Oxford

According to Oxford Assessment records, the house was built1878 although appears on the 1868 Beers atlas. 108 Oxford Road boasts two end chimneysand an elaborate portico with four pilasters. This two and one-half story whiteclapboard house, with overhanging roof is in imminent danger of demolition. Anew doctor’s office has been approved to be built on the site. The expecteddemolition delay will give potential buyers until September 2008 to remove thehouse from the site for reconstruction on their own lot. The house is offeredfor $1.00.

Contact: SallyD’Souza 203-929-7339

HPX July/August 2008 12 Obtuse Road North, Brookfield

12 Obtuse Road North,Brookfield

The main house was built circa 1820 by Amos Williamsand a cottage was added in 1900. There is also a 20th centurygambrel barn on the 3.81 acre site. The house, which is individually listed onthe State Register for Historic Places, is in need of restoration. Although thehouse itself is in good shape, it sits on a desirable, sub-dividable lot.

Contact: DianeRocconi (203) 788-5536, or diane@nationwidehouses.com

HPX -  September/October 2008 - Comstock Ferre Complex, 243-263 Main Street, Wethersfield

Comstock Ferre is possibly the oldest continuously operatingseed company in the nation. In addition to its main building, fronting on Wethersfield's Main Street, theproperty includes a large barn, the oldest section of which was probably builtsometime between the 1840s and the 1880s. The property is located in theWethersfield National Register district and the Wethersfield local historic district. Thebarns on the property recently faced demolition, but the local historicdistrict commission changed their initial ruling to deny the razing and savethe barns.

Contact: JamesNeckermann @ 860-883-6312 or neckermannj@aol.com

HPX -  September/October 2008 - Elias Sprague House, Coventry

Built in 1821 and listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, this one and a half story, four-room cape is situated on fourheavily wooded acres between moderate residential construction and the Nathan Hale State Forestin Coventry, Connecticut. The interior is almost entirelyoriginal, following the traditional floor plan of two front rooms on eitherside of a small hall with kitchen at the rear, a large central chimney andfieldstone foundation. The Sprague lot will have some deed restrictions—thebuyer will have to preserve the historic facade of the building and cannotsubdivide the property to put up other houses. The current owner, the CoventryHistorical Society, is selling the historic home in the hope that the proceedswill help maintain its other antique buildings and museums.

Contact: LandmarksAntique & Country Properties at (860) 423-7484

 

                                                                                 Photo credit: Hugh Smith

HPX -March/April 2009- Osborn House, 909 King’s Highway West, Southport

Individually listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, the Captain John Osborn House sits among other historic houseson rural King's Highway West, a section of the road between New York and Bostonthat was used for monthly mail service as early as 1672.  The originalcore of the house, dating from the late 1680s, is two-over-two rooms, witha central chimney on the ground floor.  Built in compatible style, twonewer wings with a modern kitchen and bedrooms, date from the 1950s. Historic homes like this are always in danger of demolition due to the desirabilityof the lot, especially in FairfieldCounty.

Contact:  HopeR. Kern, GRI (203) 259-5048 or Mike DeLorenzo, GRI, CRS (203) 218-2719 atMunson Real Estate or hrkern@optonline.net

Daniel Chapman House, Redding

This eighteenth-century house of a Revolutionary War patriot needs to be moved or it will face demolition. Daniel Chapman, a soldier in the American Revolution, built the house in 1773, the year he got married. Four years later, British troops under the command of General Tryon captured him as they marched through Redding during the 1777 Raid on Danbury. He died in prison in New York City in the Sugar House, where many patriots lost their lives to disease and exposure to cold. Chapman left a young widow and an infant son behind in this house in Redding.

Chapman was from a family of early settlers of Connecticut in the seventeenth century. He had the same name as his grandfather, who was the founding minister of the Congregational Church in the Greens Farms section of what is now Westport.

The one-and-a-half story house is of post and beam construction with a hand-hewn timber frame. It has a fieldstone foundation and a center chimney of brick. Painted wood shingles sheath the exterior. The original windows have been replaced.

The present owner of the house may make a contribution to moving costs. Contact: Raymond D’Angelo, chairman Redding Preservation Society, 203-938-0240.

HPX -  September/October 2008 - Masonic Hall, 245 Main Street, Wethersfield

Located on the corner of Church and Mainstreets in Old Wethersfield, this former Masonic hall from the 1920s offers agreat opportunity for re-use. Although the interior is gutted and ready for building,the exterior is in very good condition and retains the many of the originaldetails that represented freemasons and defined Masonic halls.

Contact: SharonCarducci, William Raveis Real Estate, 860-563-2881 or carduccis@Raveisre.com

HPX - March/April 2009 - Elias Sprague House, Coventry

Built in 1821 and listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, this one and a half story, four-room cape is situated on fourheavily wooded acres between moderate residential construction and the Nathan Hale State Forestin Coventry, Connecticut. The interior is almost entirelyoriginal, following the traditional floor plan of two front rooms on eitherside of a small hall with kitchen at the rear, a large central chimney andfieldstone foundation. The Sprague lot will have some deed restrictions—thebuyer will have to preserve the historic facade of the building and cannotsubdivide the property to put up other houses. The current owner, the CoventryHistorical Society, is selling the historic home in the hope that the proceedswill help maintain its other antique buildings and museums.

Contact: LandmarksAntique & Country Properties at (860) 423-7484

 

                                                                                 Photo credit: Hugh Smith

HPX -  March/April 2009 - Masonic Hall, 245 Main Street, Wethersfield

Located on the corner of Church and Mainstreets in Old Wethersfield, this former Masonic hall from the 1920s offers agreat opportunity for re-use. Although the interior is gutted and ready for building,the exterior is in very good condition and retains the many of the originaldetails that represented freemasons and defined Masonic halls.

Contact: SharonCarducci, William Raveis Real Estate, 860-563-2881 or carduccis@Raveisre.com

House, 752 Summer Hill Road, Madison

Built in an area of farms, this small house appears to have been a vacation cottage or hunting lodge. It sits on a stone platform partly obscured from the road and is one-story high, with roof ridge perpendicular to the street. Currently the exterior is covered by vinyl siding and an asphalt roof. The central chimney is of the same stone construction as the cellar. The main room has knotty pine paneling and a massive stone fireplace. There is a generous enclosed porch and one bedroom. This house is offered for $1 for relocation to a new property. Contact: Dawn O’Connell, H. Pearce Real Estate. (203) 281-3400, ext. 333.

HPX -  November/December 2008 - 66 Franklin Street, New London

1866 Italianate Housein a New LondonHistoric Register District

 

This house at 66Franklin Street is at the corner of Hempstead Street inthe Hempstead Street Historic District. The area is in the midst of significantrevitalization and most of the homes are part of a mid-19th centuryneighborhood built during New London’swhaling era. The house is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property.Landmarks is searching for someone who can move the house to another local siteor take the house apart for moving to a more distant site. Potential buyersmust demonstrate the ability to remove the home from the site and reconstructit on their own lot. A January 1, 2009 deadline has been set or the threat ofdemolition becomes imminent.

Contact: SandraKersten Chalk, New London Landmarks, Executive Director, 860-442-0003 or newlondonlandmarks@hotmail.com

66 Franklin Street, New London

  1866 Italianate House in a New London Historic Register District

This house at 66 Franklin Street is at the corner of Hempstead Street in the Hempstead Street Historic District. The area is in the midst of significant revitalization and most of the homes are part of a mid-19th century neighborhood built during New London’s whaling era. The house on its corner lot has recently been purchased by the Shiloh Baptist Church. Shiloh Baptist Church has offered to donate the house to New London Landmarks, but it must be moved to another location. The house is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Landmarks is searching for someone who can move the house to another local site or take the house apart for moving to a more distant site. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the home from the site and reconstruct it on their own lot.

 

Contact: Sandra Kersten Chalk, New London Landmarks, Executive Director, 860-442-0003 or www.newlondonlandmarks@hotmail.com

Listed: $1.00

Historic House, Enfield

This single-family, wood frame dwelling built in 1905, is available for sale for $1.00, if removed from the property. The house contains a living room, kitchen, parlor, and dining room on the first floor. The second floor has three bedrooms and one bathroom. There is storage space over the kitchen plus a full attic and basement. Its total area is 1,588 square feet.

The front porch wraps around the side of the house to form an embedded octagon, which projects from the corner and gives the facade an asymmetrical emphasis. Turned porch supports and decorative brackets are topped by a spindlework band. Patterned shingles appear in the front gable.

Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the structure from the site, reconstruct it on their own lot and leave the former site cleared and clean. For an application, please contact Wanda Torres, State Parks Division, at 860-418-5963 or wanda.torres@po.state.ct.us. The deadline is June 30, 2006.

English Bank Barn, Burlington

This circa 1880 hand-hewn. post-and-beam bank barn located at 39 Barnes Hill Road needs to be moved.  The interior of the structure is mostly in good condition, but the exteirior sheathing needs work.  Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the structure from the site, reconstruct it on their own lot, and leave the former site cleared and clean.  Contact: Bruce Flax, Burlington Insurance Company, 860-673-6015, Listed: $1.

Tarlpin House, Farmington

This rambling farmhouse, built on the west side of the Farmington Canal right of way, dates to about 1830. It was built by Asahel Peck, who was first listed as a farmer in the Scott Swamp District of Farmington in the 1830 census. The farm remained in the Peck family through most of the nineteenth century. The state acquired the property sometime before 1928 from the Tarplin family

The house is of post and beam construction and was built in three sections over time. It is an example of a simple farmhouse that grew and evolved during the mid-nineteenth century. Starting as a small, center-chimney, one-and-a-half story dwelling, it was enlarged and remodeled several times. The house survives as an unpretentious working farmhouse. It looks much as it did at the turn of the century.

A recessed, one-and-a-half-story kitchen was added, and then a one-story milk room. Each section of the house has a gable roof. Six-over-six window sashes were uses throughout, but were replaced by two-over-two sashes in much of the original section.

The interior features a Greek Revival fireplace surround and paneled doors. The kitchen wing has wainscoting. The first floor contains seven rooms, including a bathroom and kitchen. The second floor contains six rooms. The house has an attic and basement. The floor space adds up to a total of 2,670 square feet.

The house is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the structure from the site, reconstruct it on their own lot, and leave the former site cleared and clean. For an application, please contact Wanda Torres, States Parks Division, at 860-418-5963 or wanda.torres@po.state.ct.us. The deadline is June 30, 2006.

Roxbury Station, Roxbury

This 3.93 acre complex located at 6 Mine Hill Road has four buildings on it, including: a circa 1830 Railroad Depot, a circa 1830 Tobacco Processing Barn, a large wood shed (24 x 100), a a three bay Garage.

The site is bordered by the Roxbury Land Trust and the Shepaug River, including a waterfall (which is a part of the property).  The station has been closed since 1948. 

This is a great opportunity to incorporate a historically significant site with a viable commercial venture.

Contact: Bonnie Bevans 860-927-1819 office, bee@bbevansrealestate.com.  Listed at $1,500,000. 

 

 

HPX -  November/December 2008 - Masonic Hall, 245 Main Street, Wethersfield

Located on the corner of Church and Mainstreets in Old Wethersfield, this former Masonic hall from the 1920s offers agreat opportunity for re-use. Although the interior is gutted and ready for building,the exterior is in very good condition and retains the many of the originaldetails that represented freemasons and defined Masonic halls.

Contact: SharonCarducci, William Raveis Real Estate, 860-563-2881 or carduccis@Raveisre.com

Thomas Hawley House, Monroe

The “little red saltbox on Purdy Hill Road” is set on 1.3 acres and was built c1755 as the centerpiece of a large working farm. It boasts an efficient kitchen, 2 cooking fireplaces, two or three bedrooms, original paneling, cedar closets, and a separate barn and workshop, plus a large two car garage. Even though the site is presently zoned for residential use only, the fear is that if the building falls into the wrong hands, a future zoning change could threaten the house.

Contact: Tom Nissley, Prudential Realty, 203-322-1400 tnissley@prudentialct.com

Listed: $649,000.00

HPX -  November/December 2008 - Comstock Ferre Complex, 243-263 Main Street, Wethersfield

Comstock Ferre is possibly the oldest continuously operatingseed company in the nation. In addition to its main building, fronting on Wethersfield's Main Street, theproperty includes a large barn, the oldest section of which was probably builtsometime between the 1840s and the 1880s. The property is located in theWethersfield National Register district and the Wethersfield local historic district. Thebarns on the property recently faced demolition, but the local historicdistrict commission changed their initial ruling to deny the razing and savethe barns.

Contact: JamesNeckermann @ 860-883-6312 or neckermannj@aol.com

HPX -  November/December 2008 - Elias Sprague House, Coventry

Built in 1821 and listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, this one and a half story, four-room cape is situated on fourheavily wooded acres between moderate residential construction and the Nathan Hale State Forestin Coventry, Connecticut. The interior is almost entirelyoriginal, following the traditional floor plan of two front rooms on eitherside of a small hall with kitchen at the rear, a large central chimney andfieldstone foundation. The Sprague lot will have some deed restrictions—thebuyer will have to preserve the historic facade of the building and cannotsubdivide the property to put up other houses. The current owner, the CoventryHistorical Society, is selling the historic home in the hope that the proceedswill help maintain its other antique buildings and museums.

Contact: LandmarksAntique & Country Properties at (860) 423-7484

 

                                                                                 Photo credit: Hugh Smith

59 Crescent Street, Middletown

This Victorian house, built around 1880, will face demolition unless it is moved to another location.  It must be relocated to allow expansion of the hospital.  It is currently used to house hospital programs.The building’s interior is in need of renovation.  The house needs to be moved on a tight deadline, and Middlesex Hospital is willing to contribute to the cost of relocation.  Contact Randy Cole at Stratton Brook Associates, 860-651-6751.

Heritage House, Redding

Built around 1795, this two-story house is located to the west of Redding Green in the Redding Center Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Standing on a small rise, Heritage House faces another eighteenth-century dwelling across the street with protected rolling fields stretching to the horizon behind it. Heritage House abuts a historic cemetery on one side and the police station to the rear. A twenty-foot buffer separates the lot from municipal property and is protected with a conservation easement.

The house rests on a stone foundation and has a wood shingle exterior, painted white. A one-story, entry porch with a gable roof forms the focal point of the symmetrical facade. Thin columns support the arched entryway. The windows have six-over-six sashes with simple surrounds.

 Some alteration took place in the mid-nineteenth century. An Italianate-style bay window projects from the west side of the house, and a two-story addition with a flat roof stands to the rear. A historic barn with board and batten siding is located behind the house.

 Used for many years as a senior center, the Town of Redding is now offering Heritage House for sale in a sealed bid process. Bid packages are available from the First Selectman's office. A structural engineer has conducted an analysis of the building, which was funded by a grant from the Connecticut Trust. His report is part of the bid package. The house must be used as a single-family residence. It is structurally sound, but needs updating and repairs recommended by the engineer.

The house is being sold with preservation easements, which will protect its historic integrity. The town will hold an open house for potential buyers on Friday, September 8, 2006. The engineer will be available to answer questions. Contact: Ms. Anita Arnold, Office of the First Selectman, 203-938-2002. Minimum bid: $430,000.

Tarplin House, Farmington

This rambling farmhouse, built on the west side of the Farmington Canal right of way, dates to about 1830. It was built by Asahel Peck, who was first listed as a farmer in the Scott Swamp District of Farmington in the 1830 census. The farm remained in the Peck family through most of the nineteenth century. The state acquired the property sometime before 1928 from the Tarplin family

The house is of post and beam construction and was built in three sections over time. It is an example of a simple farmhouse that grew and evolved during the mid-nineteenth century. Starting as a small, center-chimney, one-and-a-half story dwelling, it was enlarged and remodeled several times. The house survives as an unpretentious working farmhouse. It looks much as it did at the turn of the century.

A recessed, one-and-a-half-story kitchen was added, and then a one-story milk room. Each section of the house has a gable roof. Six-over-six window sashes were uses throughout, but were replaced by two-over-two sashes in much of the original section.

The interior features a Greek Revival fireplace surround and paneled doors. The kitchen wing has wainscoting. The first floor contains seven rooms, including a bathroom and kitchen. The second floor contains six rooms. The house has an attic and basement. The floor space adds up to a total of 2,670 square feet.

The house is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the structure from the site, reconstruct it on their own lot, and leave the former site cleared and clean. For an application, please contact Wanda Torres, States Parks Division, at 860-418-5963 or wanda.torres@po.state.ct.us.

House and Country Store, Seymour

This one-and-a-half-story house was probably built around 1800. At present, it is engulfed in over-grown vegetation and in serious need of stabilization. An addition that is approximately 45 years old has collapsed and exposed the building to the weather at the rear.  Fortunately, the earlier core building still remains dry, with no evidence of leaks. The roof on the front entry porch has also given way, but this is not an original feature. Local lore says that the house was built in the seventeenth century, but the construction techniques do not support such an early date. The remains of another building foundation are said to exist on the property, which may mark the spot of an earlier house that became confused with this one over time.The owners, who live on a separate parcel directly behind this house, want to see it restored, but cannot afford to do the work themselves due to their limited income from Social Security. They are considering selling the house along with a country store that stands adjacent to it on the same lot.  They would also consider a partnership or any other proposal. The store was built about 50 years ago and has a spacious six room apartment on the second floor, which is in much better condition, but lacks heat. The store is now operated on a very limited basis, but has the potential to bring in substantial income as the only store on Route 334, a well-traveled state road. The existence of the apartment would allow someone to live there while restoring the house. For further information please call Mrs. Nightingale, 203-735-4902.

HPX January/February 2008 - Roxbury Station, Roxbury

This 3.93 acre complex located at 6 Mine Hill Road has four buildings on it, including: a circa 1830 railroad depot, a circa 1830 tobacco processing barn, a large wood shed (24 x 100), and a three-bay garage.The site is bordered by the Roxbury Land Trust and the Shepaug River, including a waterfall (which is a part of the property). The station has been closed since 1948.  This is a great opportunity to incorporate a historically significant site with a viable commercial venture.  

4http://www.bbevansrealestate.com/mylisting1014.html

 Contact: Bonnie Bevans (860) 927-1819 or bee@bbevansrealestate.com

HPX May/June 2007, Penfield Reef Lighthouse

NATIONAL HISTORIC LIGHTHOUSE PRESERVATION ACT OF 2000NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY
PENFIELD REEF LIGHTHOUSE
OFFSHORE OF FAIRFIELD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT
MAY 18, 2007

The light station property described on the attached sheet has been determined to be excess to the needs of the United States Coast Guard. Pursuant to the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act of 2000, 16 U.S.C. 470, this property is being made available at no cost to eligible entities defined as Federal Agencies, state and local agencies, non-profit corporations, educational agencies, or community development organizations, for education, park, recreation, cultural, or historic preservation purposes.In the event no applicant is approved for the conveyance of a historic lightstation pursuant to section 308 of the act, the historic light station shall be offered for sale. (Historic covenants will be included in all deeds)

The site is off-shore and contains no acreage. No submerged lands will be conveyed under the Quitclaim Deed. Lighthouse is accessible by water craft only.Potential applicants should be advised that the State of Connecticut does not have a submerged lands leasing program or other administrative process for conveying the states interest in submerged lands on which the lighthouse is located, and such conveyance may require an act of the Connecticut General Assembly. Applicants are encouraged to contact the Office of Long Island Sound Programs to discuss their interest in acquiring the light station. David Blatt at 860-424-3034

Any eligible entity with an interest in acquiring the described property for a use consistent with the purposes stated above, should submit a letter of interest to the address listed below by July 18, 2007.Letters of interest should include:
• Name of property
• Name of eligible entity
• Point of contact, title, address, phone and email
• Non-profit agencies must provide a copy of their state-certified articles of incorporation

Eligible entities that submit a letter of interest will be sent an application and given anopportunity to inspect the property. Building inspectors and/or contractors may accompany the applicant on the site visit. The completed application must be submitted to the Department of Interior within 90 days after the Federal Government site inspection.The Department of Interior will review applications and select an eligible entity to receive the property. The General Services Administration will complete the conveyance to the selected recipient For more information on the disposal of lighthouses, please visit our web site at http://www.cr.nps.gov/maritime/nhlpa/nhlpa.htm.

Letters of interest should be sent to:

Saundra A Robbins
GSA, Property Disposal Division
10 Causeway Street, Room 925
Boston, MA 02222
(617) 565-5710
Send a copy of the letter of interest to:
Karen Senich
Interim Director and Deputy State Historic Preservation Officer
The Amos Bull House
59 South Prospect Street
Hartford, CT 06106
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HPX January/February 2008 - Philip Johnson’s Alice Ball House in New Canaan, CT

The Alice Ball House located at 523 Oenoke Ridge was designed by Philip Johnson, master architect of the ‘Harvard Five’ mid-century modernists.  Referred to as his ‘little jewel’, this sculpture of modern architecture is sited on the ‘Ridge’ known for its estates. Built in 1953, the property encompasses 2.197 acres, the main Alice Ball House, a guest cottage, a walled secret garden, courtyards, and extensive mature plantings. As with many Modernists buildings in the area, the threat of a teardown is very real.

http://www.williampittsir.com/buyers/propdetail.asp?abspage=&thispage=1&homeid=23856461

Contact: Prudy Parris (203) 966-2633

 

HPX - November/December- Osborn House,- 2008 909 King’s Highway West, Southport

Individually listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, the Captain John Osborn House sits among other historic houseson rural King's Highway West, a section of the road between New York and Bostonthat was used for monthly mail service as early as 1672.  The originalcore of the house, dating from the late 1680s, is two-over-two rooms, witha central chimney on the ground floor.  Built in compatible style, twonewer wings with a modern kitchen and bedrooms, date from the 1950s. Historic homes like this are always in danger of demolition due to the desirabilityof the lot, especially in FairfieldCounty.

Contact:  HopeR. Kern, GRI (203) 259-5048 or Mike DeLorenzo, GRI, CRS (203) 218-2719 atMunson Real Estate or hrkern@optonline.net

HPX January/February 2008 - The Shelley House, Madison, CT

Individually listed on the National Register, the Shelley house is exceptionally well-preserved, featuring such early elements as feather-edged wall sheathing and exposed framing members with well-crafted chamfers and stops. Most impressive is the clear evidence that the house was actually built in several stages, beginning in the late 17th or early 18th century as a one-room, two-story structure with an end wall of stone, then gaining a second two-story section and finally a rear lean-to.

http://ctmls.mlxchange.com/Pub/EmailView.asp?r=572642644&s=HFD&t=HFD

Contact: Alison Gould 203-245-0456, ext 24

 

HPX January/February 2008 - Hamden Barn

This 20th century bank barn on Putnam Avenue is slated for demolition. It is wood framed and has tongue & groove sheathing. The barn may be used for materials in another project. The barn is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the structure from the site and leave the former site cleared and clean.

Contact: Chris Marchand (203) 287-7032 or CMarchand@Hamden.com

HPX January/February 2008 - 41 South Main Street, Wallingford

The Town of Wallingford is seeking proposals for the sale and development of an approximately 3000 sq ft house on a 6,875 sq ft lot, zoned for limited business use. The property is located in the center of Wallingford and will be available for inspection on January 16th and January 30th 2008 at 10 am. The house was built in 1900 and is a contributing resource in the Wallingford Center Historic District.

The request for Proposal (RFP) describing the property and selection process is available for pickup at the Purchasing Department in room 206 of the Town Hall or by calling (203) 294-2115.

The deadline for sealed proposals will be received by the Purchasing Department until March 3rd, 2008 at 2pm., prevailing local time.

 

HPX March/April 2008-  Fodero Diner

This well-preserved 1957 Fodero diner dodged the wrecking ball and the owner is looking for a high traffic spot in New Haven, or nearby, to place it. If you have a lot in mind, please contact Helmi Elsayed “Mo” Ali for more information at 203-562-5582.

 

HPX March/April 2008- Glastonbury Barn

This English barn, located at 69 House Street on Glastonbury, is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the barn from the site and reconstruct it on their own lot.

Contact: Lauren Dickenson at 860-513-5000

HPX January/February 2008-27 Vineyard Lane, Greenwich

This 1929 French eclectic house was designed by J. Alden Twachtman and his brother Quentin (sons of American Impressionist painter, John Henry Twachtman), for their brother Godfrey. The Twachtman brothers designed and built over two dozen homes in the mid-Greenwich area that are noted for their elegance and incorporation of natural surroundings. The view from the house overlooks many of the sites that John Henry Twachtman painted, paintings that now hang in many museums. The interior of 27 Vineyard Lane features carved mahogany paneling – an element that can be found in other Twachtman designed homes. The land was formerly owned by the Estate of William Rockefeller, brother of John D. Rockefeller. The house is sited on a 3.5 acre lot and is being marketed as a teardown. 

http://www.dftllc.com/residential/connecticut/greenwich/?property=27-vineyard-lane

Contact: Dominick DeVito (203)-661-3433

 

HPX March/April 2008-Pratt-Stannard House, Westbrook

Pratt-Stannard House
Westbrook (c. 1790)

This center chimney cape-style house, constructed in the last quarter of the 18th century, is located on a quiet cul-de-sac near the Menunketesuck River adjacent to 20 acres of undeveloped land being considered for incorporation into the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge.

The antique house is in untouched condition and has nine rooms, three fireplaces, and original 18th century woodwork, as well fine early 19th century woodwork from the Greek Revival period. The first floor kitchen retains the majority of its 18th century elements, including the hearth, bake oven, and the decorative fireplace surround.  The rear of the house features an early 20th century ell that offers the potential for renovation as a modern kitchen or a master suite.

 The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and the National Trust for Historic Preservation recently supported professional structural and historical studies of the house that will aid future buyers in planning for preservation and restoration of the building. 

The Pratt-Stannard house will be sold with 2 acres of surrounding land.   For more information, contact Alicia Betty or Lisa Bassani at The Trust for Public Land, (203)-777-7367.

HPX March/April 2008 -New Canaan Barn

This mid 19th century barn is in imminent danger of demolition; the demolition delay period runs out in April. The original structure is 24’ by 36’ with hand hewn posts and beams. The turn of the century addition is 24’ by 18’. The barn is located at 226 West Rd and is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the barn from the site and reconstruct it on their own lot.

Contact: The New Canaan Preservation Alliance - Mimi Findlay 203-966-4617 or Robin Beckett 646-256-8500.

 

HPX January/February 2008 - The Holley-Williams House, 15 Millerton Road, Lakeville, CT

The Holley-Williams House was built circa 1768 and is a fine example of Federal architecture.  Its past use as a museum (Salisbury Association) is ending and it sits on over 4 acres of land with barns, an ice house, outhouse and carriage house. The front portico with its Ionic columns leads into a wide entrance hall with a curving staircase, a downstairs parlor, an exhibit room, and the original keeping room. The dining room overlooks an old-fashioned walled garden.  Many architectural elements in the 1808 addition, such as the main entry door, door surround and fanlight, and interior woodwork, came from designs found in Asher Benjamin’s pattern books. The open space of the parcel consists primarily of gardens, located next to the house, and a field/orchard at the rear. Preservation restrictions are held by Historic New England.

http://www.robinleechrealestate.com/listman/listings/l0034.html

Contact: Robin Leech: (860) 435-9891 or robin@robinleechrealestate.com

 

HPX March/April - Roxbury Station, Roxbury

This 3.93 acre complex located at 6 Mine Hill Road has four buildings on it, including a circa 1830 railroad depot, a circa 1830 tobacco processing barn, a large wood shed (24 x 100), and a three-bay garage.


The site is bordered by the Roxbury Land Trust and the Shepaug River, including a waterfall (which is a part of the property). The station has been closed since 1948.


This is a great opportunity to incorporate a historically significant site with a viable commercial venture. A National Register nomination is in process, which would allow the buildings to qualify for the federal rehabilitation tax credit.

Contact: Bonnie Bevans (860) 927-1819 or bee@bbevansrealestate.com

HPX March/April 2008 - 75 Beacon Street, Norwalk

This single family house is listed in the Tax Assessor's field card as 1700, although the Norwalk Historic Resource Inventory lists it as 1740. This is an opportunity to restore a pre-revolutionary war house.

Contact: Joe Metcalfe, CT Homes LLC at 203-789-1111 or joe@cthomesllc.com

 

HPX March/April 2008 - The Shelley House, Madison, CT

Individually listed on the National Register, the Shelley house is exceptionally well-preserved, featuring such early elements as feather-edged wall sheathing and exposed framing members with well-crafted chamfers and stops. Most impressive is the clear evidence that the house was actually built in several stages, beginning in the late 17th or early 18th century as a one-room, two-story structure with an end wall of stone, then gaining a second two-story section and finally a rear lean-to.

http://ctmls.mlxchange.com/Pub/EmailView.asp?r=572642644&s=HFD&t=HFD

Contact: Alison Gould 203-245-0456, ext 24

 

Henry Schieffer House, Cheshire

This center-chimney house is in danger of being torn down, because it sits on a desirable ten-acre parcel that has attracted the interest of developers.  Built in 1805, the house rests on a fieldstone foundation almost at grade.  It has a classic, symmetrical facade centered on a front door with side lights.  Unlike many historic houses, the exterior has not been overwhelmed in later foundation plantings.Inside the house retains four brick fireplaces and chestnut beams.  There are ten rooms with two full bathrooms.  The staircase to the attic still exists.  The owner would prefer to the see the house survive and the land remain undeveloped.  Price $1.7 million. Contact: 860-982-1215.

HPX March/April 2008-27 Vineyard Lane, Greenwich

This 1929 French eclectic house was designed by J. Alden Twachtman and his brother Quentin (sons of American Impressionist painter, John Henry Twachtman), for their brother Godfrey. The Twachtman brothers designed and built over two dozen homes in the mid-Greenwich area that are noted for their elegance and incorporation of natural surroundings. The view from the house overlooks many of the sites that John Henry Twachtman painted, paintings that now hang in many museums. The interior of 27 Vineyard Lane features carved mahogany paneling – an element that can be found in other Twachtman designed homes. The land was formerly owned by the Estate of William Rockefeller, brother of John D. Rockefeller. The house is sited on a 3.5 acre lot and is being marketed as a teardown. 

http://www.dftllc.com/residential/connecticut/greenwich/?property=27-vineyard-lane

Contact: Dominick DeVito (203)-661-3433

 

HPX -January/February 2009- Osborn House, 909 King’s Highway West, Southport

Individually listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, the Captain John Osborn House sits among other historic houseson rural King's Highway West, a section of the road between New York and Bostonthat was used for monthly mail service as early as 1672.  The originalcore of the house, dating from the late 1680s, is two-over-two rooms, witha central chimney on the ground floor.  Built in compatible style, twonewer wings with a modern kitchen and bedrooms, date from the 1950s. Historic homes like this are always in danger of demolition due to the desirabilityof the lot, especially in FairfieldCounty.

Contact:  HopeR. Kern, GRI (203) 259-5048 or Mike DeLorenzo, GRI, CRS (203) 218-2719 atMunson Real Estate or hrkern@optonline.net

HPX:November/December 2006, The Bennett House, New Milford

The Bennett House, located at 70 Bridge Street New Milford, was constructed in 1790 and has a Gross Building Area of approximately 3,028 square feet.  The first floor interior layout includes an entrance foyer, two dining rooms, two restrooms, and a kitchen with a walk in cooler (10x12).  The second floor includes six bedrooms, one office, and one full bathroom. 

It is in the opinion of the Connecticut State Historic Preservation Officer that the Frederick G. Bennett House is eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.  The property will be transferred subject to the recipient agreeing to an off-site relocation.  This structure will be available for relocation between July 2007 & September 2007.

Potential recipients must demonstrate their ability to assume legal and financial responsibility for the structure.  Any non-governmental party must be able to demonstrate its economic and administrative ability to perform the relocation of the property, such as a surety bond, a trust fund, or a reverter to some other responsible agency.

Contact: Keith T. Hall, Transportation Supervising Planner at the Connecticut Department of Transportation, 2800 Berlin Turnpike, P.O. Box 317546, Newington, CT 06131-7546.  (860) 594-2926.  All proposals will be accepted until November 23, 2006, and reviewed within a thirty-day period.

66 Franklin Street, New London

  1866 Italianate House in a New London Historic Register District

This house at 66 Franklin Street is at the corner of Hempstead Street in the Hempstead Street Historic District. The area is in the midst of significant revitalization and most of the homes are part of a mid-19th century neighborhood built during New London’s whaling era. The house on its corner lot has recently been purchased by the Shiloh Baptist Church. Shiloh Baptist Church has offered to donate the house to New London Landmarks, but it must be moved to another location. The house is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Landmarks is searching for someone who can move the house to another local site or take the house apart for moving to a more distant site. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the home from the site and reconstruct it on their own lot.

 

Contact: Sandra Kersten Chalk, New London Landmarks, Executive Director, 860-442-0003 or www.newlondonlandmarks@hotmail.com

Listed: $1.00

HPX -September/October 2009-Osborn House, 909 King’s Highway West, Southport

Individually listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, the Captain John Osborn House sits among other historic houseson rural King's Highway West, a section of the road between New York and Bostonthat was used for monthly mail service as early as 1672.  The originalcore of the house, dating from the late 1680s, is two-over-two rooms, witha central chimney on the ground floor.  Built in compatible style, twonewer wings with a modern kitchen and bedrooms, date from the 1950s. Historic homes like this are always in danger of demolition due to the desirabilityof the lot, especially in FairfieldCounty.

Contact:  HopeR. Kern, GRI (203) 259-5048 atMunson Real Estate or hrkern@optonline.net

Thomas Hawley House, Monroe

The “little red saltbox on Purdy Hill Road” is set on 1.3 acres and was built c1755 as the centerpiece of a large working farm. It boasts an efficient kitchen, 2 cooking fireplaces, two or three bedrooms, original paneling, cedar closets, and a separate barn and workshop, plus a large two car garage. Even though the site is presently zoned for residential use only, the fear is that if the building falls into the wrong hands, a future zoning change could threaten the house.

Contact: Tom Nissley, Prudential Realty, 203-322-1400 tnissley@prudentialct.com

Listed: $649,000.00

Roxbury Station, Roxbury

This 3.93 acre complex located at 6 Mine Hill Road has four buildings on it, including: a circa 1830 Railroad Depot, a circa 1830 Tobacco Processing Barn, a large wood shed (24 x 100), a a three bay Garage.

The site is bordered by the Roxbury Land Trust and the Shepaug River, including a waterfall (which is a part of the property).  The station has been closed since 1948. 

This is a great opportunity to incorporate a historically significant site with a viable commercial venture.

Contact: Bonnie Bevans 860-927-1819 office, bee@bbevansrealestate.com.  Listed at $1,500,000. 

 

 

HPX -  January/February 2009 - Masonic Hall, 245 Main Street, Wethersfield

Located on the corner of Church and Mainstreets in Old Wethersfield, this former Masonic hall from the 1920s offers agreat opportunity for re-use. Although the interior is gutted and ready for building,the exterior is in very good condition and retains the many of the originaldetails that represented freemasons and defined Masonic halls.

Contact: SharonCarducci, William Raveis Real Estate, 860-563-2881 or carduccis@Raveisre.com

HPX: November/December 2006, Seth Wetmore House, Middletown

This elegant and imposing mansion was built in 1746 on a hillside site with views to Middletown and the Connecticut River. Wetmore was a successful merchant, judge and landowner, and his house boasts decorative details found in the homes of many of the Connecticut Valley elite known as the “River Gods.” On the outside, an impressive scroll-pedimented doorway dominates the facade. Indoors, the painted parlor, one of the great treasures of American decorative art, was removed to the Wadsworth Atheneum in 1988 and replaced with a replica, but other historic interiors remain, boasting wide-planked floors, fine paneling, an ornate stair and 8 fireplaces. The house is individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places, making it potentially eligible for federal rehabilitation tax credits.

The Wetmore house offers over 7,000 square feet, with 10 bedrooms, 3 full baths and 2 kitchens. Its generous size and proximity to Wesleyan University, make a bed-and-breakfast a possible reuse option. Though livable, the house needs extensive repairs, and the Connecticut Trust listed it in 2003 as one of the Most Important Threatened Historic Places in Connecticut.

With its exceptional architectural quality, the Wetmore house has the potential to be one of Connecticut's historic showplaces.

Contact: Betsy Purtell 203-640-4440 or BPurtell@coldwellbankermoves.com

Listed: $335,900

HPX: November/December 2006, English Bank Barn, Farmington

This c1780 English bank barn located at 37 Mountain Spring Road needs a new home. It has 11 inch posts with scribe rule marriage marks. The barn is in very good condition. An attached barn is dated c1820. The c1820 barn is probably past rehabilitation, but can be used for parts, particularly the clapboard. The owner suggests an $8,000.00 landscaping fee after the potential buyer demonstrates the ability to remove the structure from the site and reconstruct it on their own lot.

Contact: Chris Raferty at 973-214-1506 or cflraferty@earthlink.net.

Listed: $1.00 plus landscaping fee

 

The Music Box, Morris

Built in the 1920s as a dance hall overlooking Bantam Lake, this large structure has stood emply and unused since 1989. At present, the waterfront property contains a marina, which is a going concern. However, the marina does not make use of the Jazz Age building, which was known historically as the Music Box. In its heyday in the 1930s and 40s, the Music box was a fashionable night spot where legendary performers of the big-band era appeared, such as Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey and their orchestra.

In the 1950s the large dance floor was converted to a roller-skating rink. Patrons could arrive by boat and tie up at the marina, while they went inside to roller skate, a popular activity at the time.

A new owner took the building back to its dance hall roots in 1961. This time around, patrons danced to the beat of rock and roll. The building was renamed Beverly’s in the 1970s and became a major venue for rock bands in the Northeast. Beverly’s included a restaurant and bar, as well as live music, until it closed in 1989.

The two-story building is in good condition. The exterior is covered in wood vertical-board siding, painted barn red. A spacious deck at the second floor level overlooks the lake and is supported by stury posts. The property aslo has parking for almost 400 cars and a marina with 112 boat slips plus two apartments. The former dance hall seems perfectly suited to becoming a restuarant with scenic water views.

 Lot Size: 2.82 acres.

Contact McNamara Real Estate, 860-567-8255.

 Price: $3.8 million.

Book Barns, Bethany

The owners of this unique book business, with roots that reach back through four generations of booksellers, are retiring and offering the bucolic land, its barns, and the enterprise for sale. The property contains three acres of open meadows and three barns. Two are long and low turkey barns and the third is a two-story sheep barn. There is no house on the property. In an unusual adaptive use, these farm buildings have housed a vast collection of books of all types-from popular fiction to rare editions-for more than half a century. The second floor of the sheep barn also houses an impressive collection of antique maps and prints.

The business is grandfathered into a residential zone. It is hoped that someone will buy the book business on site and continue to make the property a beautiful and rewarding destination for book lovers. The business is also offered for sale without the property. If it were sold and relocated elsewhere, the fate of the barns would be uncertain.

The barns are equipped with heat and electricity. The main turkey barn also has a well and septic system.

Price: $550,000 for the property, book business, and inventory.

 Contact: Carol Cangiano, William Orange Realty, 203-397-7900.

HPX - May/June 2009 - Comstock Ferre Complex, 243-263 Main Street, Wethersfield

Comstock Ferre is possibly the oldest continuously operatingseed company in the nation. In addition to its main building, fronting on Wethersfield's Main Street, theproperty includes a large barn, the oldest section of which was probably builtsometime between the 1840s and the 1880s. The property is located in theWethersfield National Register district and the Wethersfield local historic district. Thebarns on the property recently faced demolition, but the local historicdistrict commission changed their initial ruling to deny the razing and savethe barns.

Contact: JamesNeckermann @ 860-883-6312 or neckermannj@aol.com

Hill House, Madison

This interesting nineteenth-century house has a Greek Revival door surround and a recessed front door.  The pyramidal roof (a variation on a hipped roof) is the only one found in Madison.  The house stands on a picturesque site behind a stone wall on a country road.  The exterior is sheathed in clapboard and the window sashes are six-over-six.  The floors and interior woodwork seem to be original.  The house has three bedrooms and two bathrooms.The building appears to be structurally sound, but needs complete rehabilitation and updating.  The scenic property includes pond, mature trees and plantings, and some meadow and woods.  The owner has not determined a price yet.  Lot size: 2.2 acres.  Contact: Warren Hartmann, 203-245-8111 (office) or 203-530-4077 (cell).

Henry Schieffer House, Cheshire

This center-chimney house is in danger of being torn down, because it sits on a desirable ten-acre parcel that has attracted the interest of developers.  Built in 1805, the house rests on a fieldstone foundation almost at grade.  It has a classic, symmetrical facade centered on a front door with side lights.  Unlike many historic houses, the exterior has not been overwhelmed in later foundation plantings.Inside the house retains four brick fireplaces and chestnut beams.  There are ten rooms with two full bathrooms.  The staircase to the attic still exists.  The owner would prefer to the see the house survive and the land remain undeveloped.  Price $1.7 million. Contact: 860-982-1215.

New Britain National Bank Building, New Britain

This seven story building with extraordinary interiors was completed in 1927 for the Commercial Trust Company.  Designed in the Romanesque Revival style with occasional Gothic flourishes, it is constructed of limestone and red brick.  A row of three tall, round-arched windows gives bold definition to the facade, while a wealth of ornamental detail enriches the surfaces on both the interior and exterior.  Known locally as the Anvil Bank, an anvil motif is incorporated into the intricate brickwork throughout.  Images related to the currency of the period, such as the Mercury dime and the Buffalo nickel, appear on the bronze doors.  Elegant brass quatrefoils enhance the entry.  An elaborate, pointed-arch window appears above.Inside the bank lobby a soaring 30-foot-high ceiling creates a magnificent space.  Marble adorns the floors and walls.  Bronze further embellishes the interior and is used in chandeliers, wall sconces, and the ornate elevator doors.The Commercial Trust Company, like many others, succembed to the hardships of the Depression.  It was bought out by the New Britain National Bank in the 1930s.  More recently, the property has been mostly vacant since Fleet Bank moved out in 1996.Deferred maintenance has resulted in a leaking roof and a flooded sub-basement.  The heat has been off for three years, and the elements are beginning to take an extreme toll.  Despite these setbacks, the building is entirely solid.  The repair work needed is extensive, but manageable.  It would involve installing new mechanical systems, a new roof, and abatement of hazardous materials.  A plan for egress from the upper floors would need to be worked out in order to comply with the building code.The former bank could be converted into restaurant space, nightclub or antiques marketplace.  The upper floors were historically used as offices, but could also become appealing upscale apartments or condominiums.  Downtown New Britain is experiencing many encouraging signs of economic revitalization and offers ample parking.  Size: 38, 500 total square feet; 32,000 square feet of office space.  Price: $450,000. Contact: Don Courtemanche, 860-229-0878.

The Music Box, Morris

Built in the 1920s as a dance hall overlooking Bantam Lake, this large structure has stood emply and unused since 1989. At present, the waterfront property contains a marina, which is a going concern. However, the marina does not make use of the Jazz Age building, which was known historically as the Music Box. In its heyday in the 1930s and 40s, the Music box was a fashionable night spot where legendary performers of the big-band era appeared, such as Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey and their orchestra.

In the 1950s the large dance floor was converted to a roller-skating rink. Patrons could arrive by boat and tie up at the marina, while they went inside to roller skate, a popular activity at the time.

A new owner took the building back to its dance hall roots in 1961. This time around, patrons danced to the beat of rock and roll. The building was renamed Beverly’s in the 1970s and became a major venue for rock bands in the Northeast. Beverly’s included a restaurant and bar, as well as live music, until it closed in 1989.

The two-story building is in good condition. The exterior is covered in wood vertical-board siding, painted barn red. A spacious deck at the second floor level overlooks the lake and is supported by stury posts. The property aslo has parking for almost 400 cars and a marina with 112 boat slips plus two apartments. The former dance hall seems perfectly suited to becoming a restuarant with scenic water views.

 Lot Size: 2.82 acres.

Contact McNamara Real Estate, 860-567-8255.

 Price: $3.8 million.

Kenyon Mill, Coventry

The Town of Coventry is seeking proposals for the adaptive use of the historic Kenyon Mill and four other interconnected buildings.  The long, two-and-a-half story building is located next to a mill pond in the South Coventry Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.  Built in 1859, the wood-frame building has a clapboard exterior and rests on a foundation of cut-granite blocks.  A vertical line of three loading doors forms a stricking feature directly below the hoisting timber located at the peak of the gable-end facade.C.H. Kenyon, a manufacturer of woolen pants, bought the mill in 1864 from another woolen maker.  Historical records show that in 1870 Kenyon’s mill was a mjor enterprise with more than 70 employees (40 men and 34 women) and extensive equipment, including two sets of carding machines, 52 looms, and 1,200 spindles.The town has invested $500,000 to stabilize the complex, including installing a new roof on the 1859 mill and repairing areas of water-damaged floors.  It has restored the north facade with cedar clapboard and twelve-over-twelve windows and paneled doors made of wood.  The bell tower seen in historical images is now missing, but its base has been repaired.  Some windows on the building are boarded up and others are covered with plexi-glass or plastic to secure the mill.  The town has conducted environmental remediation on all the soil that required off-site disposal.  Environmental and structural reports have been prepared, as well as drawings for documentation of the historic building.  All utilities will need to be replaced, as will access drives and parking surfaces.The Town of Coventry is looking for proposals that will preserve the unique characteristics of this piece of its nineteenth-century manufacturing history.  The new use must also be compatible with the primarily residential character of the surrounding neighborhood.  A pedestrian link with the village center is another priority.  Possible uses include professional offices for high-tech, research and design, or environmental firms.  The picturesque setting could make it a desirable location for a restaurant, conference center, or arts center.  A non-polluting, low-impact industrial use might also be considered.  Lot size: 10.1 acres. Usable square footage: 1859 mill - 14,140 sq. feet; all buildings combined - 32, 412 sq. feet.  Minimum offer: $65,000.  Deadline: 11 am, March 14, 2006. Contact: John Elsesser, Town Manager, 860-742-6324 or jelsesser@coventryct.org.  For further information and maps see http://www.coventryct.com.

Heritage House, Redding

Built around 1795, this two-story house is located to the west of Redding Green in the Redding Center Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Standing on a small rise, Heritage House faces another eighteenth-century dwelling across the street with protected rolling fields stretching to the horizon behind it. Heritage House abuts a historic cemetery on one side and the police station to the rear. A twenty-foot buffer separates the lot from municipal property and is protected with a conservation easement.

The house rests on a stone foundation and has a wood shingle exterior, painted white. A one-story, entry porch with a gable roof forms the focal point of the symmetrical facade. Thin columns support the arched entryway. The windows have six-over-six sashes with simple surrounds.

 Some alteration took place in the mid-nineteenth century. An Italianate-style bay window projects from the west side of the house, and a two-story addition with a flat roof stands to the rear. A historic barn with board and batten siding is located behind the house.

 Used for many years as a senior center, the Town of Redding is now offering Heritage House for sale in a sealed bid process. Bid packages are available from the First Selectman’s office. A structural engineer has conducted an analysis of the building, which was funded by a grant from the Connecticut Trust. His report is part of the bid package. The house must be used as a single-family residence. It is structurally sound, but needs updating and repairs recommended by the engineer.

The house is being sold with preservation easements, which will protect its historic integrity. The town will hold an open house for potential buyers on Friday, September 8, 2006. The engineer will be available to answer questions. Contact: Office of the First Selectman, 203-938-2002. Minimum bid: $430,000.

60 Crescent Street, Middletown

This masonry Victorian house, built around 1880, will face demolition unless it is moved to another location.  It must be relocated to allow expansion of the hospital.  It is currently used to house hospital programs.The building is in good condition.  The house needs to be moved on a tight deadline, and Middlesex Hospital is willing to contribute to the cost of relocation.  Contact:  Randy Cole at Stratton Brook Associates, 860-651-6751.

Book Barns, Bethany

The owners of this unique book business, with roots that reach back through four generations of booksellers, are retiring and offering the bucolic land, its barns, and the enterprise for sale. The property contains three acres of open meadows and three barns. Two are long and low turkey barns and the third is a two-story sheep barn. There is no house on the property. In an unusual adaptive use, these farm buildings have housed a vast collection of books of all types-from popular fiction to rare editions-for more than half a century. The second floor of the sheep barn also houses an impressive collection of antique maps and prints.

The business is grandfathered into a residential zone. It is hoped that someone will buy the book business on site and continue to make the property a beautiful and rewarding destination for book lovers. The business is also offered for sale without the property. If it were sold and relocated elsewhere, the fate of the barns would be uncertain.

The barns are equipped with heat and electricity. The main turkey barn also has a well and septic system.

Price: $550,000 for the property, book business, and inventory.

 Contact: Carol Cangiano, William Orange Realty, 203-397-7900.

St. John’s Rectory, Bridgeport

The large, stone rectory of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Bridgeport is in need of extensive repairs. The church has applied for a demolition permit, because it is unable to spend the money to do the necessary work and the building is not essential to its needs. However, the church would prefer to find a way to keep the building standing. As yet, the right solution has not emerged and the 90-day demolition delay for historic structures has expired. Finding an organization or individual that would agree to rehabilitate the building in return for a lease at a nominal fee would be the preferred solution, as long as the proposed use of the building is compatible with the church’s mission. Time is of the essence.

The rectory is part of an important religious complex, which is located in a key position just on the edge of Bridgeport’s downtown commercial core. Along with St. John’s Church and the other buildings in the complex, the rectory is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. James Renwick, Jr., architect of the renowned St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City, designed St. John’s Church in the Gothic Revival style. Renwick was one of the country’s leading architects in the nineteenth-century. The church was completed in 1875.

In 1900 the widow of a former rector left the church a bequest to build a stone rectory in the same style as the church. Local architect Guy C. Hunt designed the substantial Gothic Revival building, which was finished in 1903. The two-and-a-half-story rectory is located on the northeast corner of the church property and oriented toward Park Avenue. A gabled pavilion projects from the front façade, and a crenellated parapet tops a stone porch. The interior was most recently used as offices. A large central hall is finished in Flemish quarter-sawn oak with a beamed ceiling. Fine detailing exists throughout.

Urgent repairs, including fixing the leaking roof, are estimated at $210,000. A second phase of necessary work is estimated at about $900,000. A third phase could bring the total project to $1.5 million depending on the amenities required. The church will consider a 99 year lease at $1 a year for the right applicant. Contact: St. John’s Episcopal Church, 203-335-2528.

David Field House, Madison

This classic New England saltbox dates from the first half of the eighteenth-century. It has a center chimney and a symmetrical facade. The exterior is sided with narrow clapboard. Both the foun­dation and the chimney are constructed of fieldstone. Most of the windows have eight-over-twelve sashes. The center window above the front door is narrower with a six-over-nine arrangement. The entry vestibule is a later addition. The house is of post and beam construction. Physical evidence in the roof framing suggests that its saltbox form developed as a result of a lean-to added at the rear, rather than as an integral part of the original structure. Although the interior is in neglected condition, it contains a number of notable early features, such as raised-panel doors, wide-board floors, and a paneled wall next to the parlor fireplace. The Field House is listed on the State Register of Historic Places. It needs extensive restoration. The Field family had many distinguished members, including Stephen J. Field, who served the nation as a justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

The owner will consider selling the house on site at a price to be determined or will allow it to be moved elsewhere for restora­tion. Local preservationists hope that it will stay in its original location or, at least, within Madison. For further information contact the owner, Michael Montanaro, at 203-246-7340 or Jane Kuhl, president Madison Historical Society at 203-421-3050.

HPX: Sept/Oct 2010 - Collins Axe Factory, Collinsville

Collins Axe Factory, Collinsville

The Collins Axe Factory is for sale again.  As reported in the Hartford Courant on August 15, 2010, owner James Tilney is offering the 19 acre property for redevelopment with the desire to have some preliminary town approvals already in place for prospective developers. Retaining the factory's historical charm and its trademark exterior is a central focus in the conceptual architectural and engineering plans, according to Julius Fialkiewicz, the owner’s real estate agent.

The Connecticut Trust has been following this landmark structure for some time, listed the Collins Axe Company on its Most Important Threatened: 2005 (CPN, September-October 2005) and again in Great Preservation Opportunities: 2009 (CPN September-October 2009).   The namesake of Collinsville, the factory once produced world-famous edge tools-axes and hatchets, machetes, bayonets - even the pikes that John Brown and his raiders used at Harper's Ferry. More recently, the company's factory has been an incubator for small businesses, located by the Farmington River in a village that is both a National Register district and a Local Historic District.

Offered at $6 million with the total cost of remediation and redevelopment estimated at approximately $50 million.

Contact:

Julius Fialkiewicz

Realty Works, LLC

124 Main Street,

Canton, CT  06019

Phone: 860 693-6066 x212, email: JandG@RealtyWorksCT.com.

Woodhull House, Norwich

This house stands on Broadway within the Little Plain Historic District. A two-story portico dominates the facade. Bold dentils trim the pedi­ment, which is supported by four Tuscan columns. Pilasters appear at the corners and between each vertical set of windows across the front. The house has a low hipped roof with a pair of chimneys on each side. The tri­angular window in the pediment appears to be original. Inside, the house has been divided into five apartments and was par­tially gutted in the process. However, a number of historic details remain including four fireplaces. One has a later Gothic Revival mantel, while the other three seem to be original. A two-story ell to the rear retains wide-board floors. The house has approximately 3,200 square feet with high ceil­ings. The building requires extensive repair and rehabilitation. The one-acre parcel includes a mid-nineteenth-century barn and an ample side yard. Price: asking $199,000, which is considered negotiable.Contact: Frederic Allyn, III, Allyn Associates, fred3@allynassociates.com or 860-892-1335.

DiSanti House, 785 Foxon Road, North Branford

Another house connected to Italian immigrants and the New Haven Trap Rock Company, this was built about 1921 for members of the DiSanti family, who also operated a slaughterhouse on the property. The house is a small, one-and-a-half story dwelling on a rubble foundation, with roof ridge perpendicular to the street. A porch runs the width of the front. Interior details are simple, the most notable features being recessed panel doors and a handsome newel; windows are general­ly wooden sash.

This house is offered for $1 for relocation to a new property. Contact: Dawn O’Connell, H. Pearce Real Estate. (203) 281-3400, ext 333.

House, 115 Sperry Road, Woodbridge

This small one-and-a-half story house was probably built about 1810 and under­went extensive renovations during the nineteenth century or the beginning of the twentieth century. The main block has a simple four bay facade. A small porch with oversized Greek Revival columns at the front door and a large rear sunroom with a fieldstone fireplace are additions to the original structure. The interior is simple, with two rooms flanking the chimney on each floor, and some Craftsman style woodwork. Little maintenance has been done on the house in the past few years, and the sills may need repair. But it seems on the whole to be in good struc­tural condition. This house is offered for $1 for relocation to a new property. Contact: Dawn O’Connell, H. Pearce Real Estate. (203) 281-3400, ext. 333.

HPX: May/June 2004

May/June 2004
The Historic Properties Exchange is supported by Cesar Pelli and Associates Architects.

THE SOUTH CENTRAL CONNECTICUT REGIONAL WATER AUTHORITY IS OFFERING THE LAST SEVEN LISTED BUILDINGS FOR REMOVAL FROM RWA PROPERTY.

For more information, call the agent listed below or see related articles in Connecticut Preservation News and at www.cttrust.org

The Fred Harrison House, 105 North Street, North Branford

This house was built around 1915 for Fred Harrison and his family and was relo­cated after the New Haven Water Company acquired the property in 1927. Fred and his brother were carpenters and probably built the house themselves. The house is a well designed and well preserved one-and-a-half story wood-frame bun­galow that features Craftsman-style elements, such as fieldstone-faced foundation, shingle siding, integral front porch with tapered square columns, and bay win­dows and dormers with either shed or gable roofs. Inside is a flowing plan of rooms that open to each other, as well as varnished woodwork, pocket doors, and built-ins. A group of outbuildings behind the Harrison House served various domestic functions. The central section of the largest of these buildings is an early twentieth century gable-end barn, which was expanded on each side. The house and outbuildings are being offered for $1 each for relocation to a new property. Contact: Dawn O’Connell, H. Pearce Real Estate. (203) 281-3400, ext. 333.

HPX Update: Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding

Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding, Saved from Demolition.

This vernacular historic house and its two barns were saved from destruction through the advocacy efforts of the Redding Preservation Society, along with the perseverance of town historian Charles Couch and the support of the Redding Historical Society. The buildings were located on a modest farm that had been tended by the Qualey family in the nineteenth century. Patrick and Kathryn Qualey emigrated from Ireland and settled in Redding in the 1870s. Members of the family occupied the house into the 1940s. The land is now owned by the Redding Country Club. At the urging of the Preservation Society and Mr. Couch, the Country Club agreed to allow the buildings to be removed from the property for reassembly elsewhere, as an alternative to demolition. The house and barns were listed in the July/August 2003 issue of the Exchange. 

 The buildings have been disassembled and the parts numbered and stored for reconstruction on another tract of land within the Town of Redding. The three buildings will remain together, thereby retaining their historical association with one another, although their uses may be reversed. The house may be used for storage and one of the barns adapted as living quarters.

During disassembly, physical evidence revealed that the house was older than first thought and, in fact, dated from the mid-eighteenth century. It appears that the building was originally a one-and-a-half story, center-chimney, Cape Cod style house. The roof was raised and a full second story and attic were added around 1870, when the Qualey family took possession. Mr. Couch coordinated the many facets of the project, and the Redding Country Club contributed to the cost of disassembly and moving.

Shepard Carriage House, West Hartford

The Town of West Hartford and local preservationists are working to save this spacious carriage house, which must be moved as part of the plan for the town’s new public middle school. It was built to complement the Shepard House, which was designed by prestigious Hartford architect Edward T. Hapgood and built in 1900. The house was formerly the headquarters of the Kingswood-Oxford School and is being reused as an administration building for the new school. The carriage house was added in 1917 and was designed by Cortlandt F. Luce, a West Hartford resident, who designed 12 distinctive houses on West Hill Drive including his own. A structural engineer hired by the town has determined that the building can be moved. The town plans to demolish a porte cochere and the later additions that connect the carriage house to the main house. The carriage house will then become a freestanding building. The two-story carriage house has dimensions of 30 feet by 60 feet with 3,600 square feet of floor space. The building could be rehabilitated as a private home.The first floor of the carriage house contains a three-bay garage, as well as usable raw space, which could provide an area for a kitchen and bathroom. The second floor has dramatic Palladian windows on two sides with original leaded glass that illuminate an elegant ballroom. The ballroom has high ceilings, original woodwork, and a fireplace, along with built-in bookshelves. There are also a number of small rooms on the second floor.Moving costs are estimated at about $250,000 for a move to a nearby site. There are several empty lots on Prospect Avenue that could be potential locations. The building would have to be moved onto a new foundation. The town is planning to begin demolition of the old school buildings on the site in late winter or early spring and the carriage house would have to be moved at that time.Price: $1. Anyone with a serious interest in the building should contact Ron Van Winkle, Director Community Services Department, Town Of West Hartford, (860) 523-3284.  For historical information contact Mary Donohue, Chair, West Hartford Historic District Commission, (860) 523-5158.

Ernst House, Norwalk

This stately Neoclassical mansion was built in 1908 for George Ernst, an important collector of early American furniture. It is now owned by Norwalk Hospital. Located on Elmcrest Terrace overlooking South Norwalk and the harbor, the building is one of a row of three large houses built in the late nineteenth-century. Known locally as the “Three Sisters,” they are reminders of the grand architecture of a once wealthy and prestigious residential neighborhood. The other two buildings, which stand to the left of the Ernst House are excellent examples of the Queen Anne style and are now used as apartment and rooming houses. A parking lot for Norwalk Hospital is located to the right. The house is under imminent threat of demolition for more parking, but the hospital has allowed a short reprieve while preservationists seek a buyer for the house and lot. If the hospital can recoup its purchase costs by selling the house quickly, it will forgo using the site and will expand its parking capacity elsewhere.Constructed of brick on a granite base, the building was designed to provide a setting for Ernst’s extraordinary collection of early American furniture and decorative objects. The academic precision of the architectural details reflects his knowledge of history. An impressive two-story portico with four Doric columns lends grandeur to the facade. A second-story balcony rests above an elaborate front door, and dentils trim the pediment, which contains a semi-elliptical window. The main roof is tile, while slate is used on some of the additions. These were probably added by Ernst himself soon after the house was built and are in keeping with the original concept. The rearmost addition suggests a brick one-story kitchen ell of a type seen in the South. A freestanding low brick wall encloses a rectangular plot for a kitchen garden and remains as a landscape feature behind the house. Ernst was a pioneer in the appreciation of American decorative arts and amassed his collection before it became fashionable.The interior retains many interesting features including a mantel derived from the work of Christopher Wren and accurately referenced Federal style moldings. The building has been vacant for about a year. It was most recently used as doctors’ offices and could become an office complex again or a multi-family residence.  The building contains 6,000 square feet of floor space, which could be augmented by constructing an addition if needed. Price: $925,000. Contact: Norwalk Preservation Trust, 203-899-0480.

HPX Alert: 1740 Colonial, Westport

This beautiful c. 1740 Connecticut center chimney home is looking for new owners.  Original huge center chimney with two fireplaces, wide pine floorboards, dogleg staircase, and timber frame construction with exposed beams is waiting for you!  A beautiful house with original windows, woodwork, and many doors, and a fully finished second floor living space.  This house also includes two additional c. 1929 wings which bring the square footage to almost 2800 square feet of living space.This house must be relocated soon, so interested parties be ready to move quickly.  Preference will be given to State Historic Preservation Offices and museums; price negotiable for private use.  Dismantling, labeling, shipping, documenting, and reconstruction services available.For more information, please visit http://homelesshomes.com/westport.htm or contact Vikki Papesh at Homeless Homes / Historic Preservation LLC via email at historicpreservation@wideopenwest.com or phone at (586) 615-7733.December 2003 Update: This house will be vacated in mid to late March and will be demolished by the end of April if a relocation contract is not secured. This house has not been contemporized and retains so much historic material that it is definitely worthy of preservation.

Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding

This vernacular two-story house is linked to the history of Irish immigration. It was the home of Patrick and Kathryn Qualey, who sought a better life in Connecticut.  They built and tended a modest farmstead on seven acres and raised their family there. Members of the Qualey family occupied the house into the 1940s.  The adjacent Redding Country Club now owns the property and is offering to give away the house and two barns, if removed for restoration on another site. The buildings may be obtained and moved separately, however it would be desirable for them to retain their historical association with one another.The house is oriented with the gable end to the street. Brackets support a shallow pitched roof over the front door, which is centered on the facade. The house is of post and beam construction and has clapboard siding. The window sashes are one-over-one. Much of the original plaster remains on the interior walls, and the ceilings are seven feet high on both floors. The barns are also of post and beam construction.  The larger one has some roof damage.  The timeliness of proposals is important. The Country Club may contribute to moving costs for the right applicant. Contact: Michael Sautkulis, 203-938-2567.

Rollwood Carriage House, Guilford

This 26 by 50 foot outbuilding was constructed about 1920 as part of a picturesque gentleman’s farm called Rollwood. The name of the farm was a descriptive contraction of the name of the owner, Rollin Woodruff, a former governor of Connecticut. The main house, which was built in the style of an Adirondack hunting lodge, burned down a few years ago. The property is now owned by the Town of Guilford. The town is offering the building for $1.00 if removed from the site and reconstructed elsewhere. Terms of the sale would include leaving the site clean and obtaining an insurance certificate. Although unusual for the period, the carriage house is of post and beam construction. Shingles clad the exterior. According to an oral history account, it housed the former governor’s car at some point, which would indicate a typical evolution from carriage house to garage. The ground floor is divided into two sections, and one side was probably used as a horse stable for a period of time. Parts of the interior contain bead-board walls and ceilings. Built into a slope, the carriage house has a fieldstone foundation on the side facing the street. Cement was used elsewhere. An attached one-story shed no longer stands, but its outline and roofline can be seen on the east wall where vertical boards appear instead of shingles.If restored to its original appearance, the carriage house would be a handsome asset, but it needs extensive work. A hole in the south side is estimated at fifteen-feet across. The ridge beam is broken and would need to be replaced during reconstruction of the building. Most of the windows are damaged. Some parts of the building are overgrown with vines. If a buyer is not found by November 15, 2003, the town’s public works department will take down the building. Contact: Jim Portley, Town Engineer, 203-453-8037. Further historical information may be obtained from the Henry Whitfield State Museum, 203-453-2467.

HPX Update: Elias Bradley House, New Haven

With an excellent location for its future home, this two story Greek Revival House will be shepherded to a new location by Neighborhood Housing Services of New Haven. The house was listed as an emergency alert on the Connecticut Trust web site in September of this year after publication of the last Exchange. At that time it was under immediate threat of demolition, because new development was planned for its site and adjacent property in the Westville section of New Haven. Site preparation was scheduled to begin right away. The owner agreed to allow the house to be moved to another property in order to save it from destruction.The move is planned for December 1. The Bradley House will then stand on a lot between two other historic houses in a very appropriate setting just below West Rock. At press time a contract is expected to be signed within the week. Neighborhood Housing Services will serve as the intermediate owner and has facilitated and organized the move. Elias Bradley built the house in 1835. It has pleasing proportions and a number of characteristic Greek Revival features. The gable end faces the street with a full triangular pediment. A one-story portico creates a focal point and shelters the entrance. Two fluted Doric columns rest on brick steps. The first- and second-story windows retain the original six-over-six sash, and a typical rectangular window appears in the pediment. Clapboard sheathes the exterior and the foundation is made of cut stone block. The building will retain its original use as a single family residence.

Shepard Carriage House, West Hartford

The Town of West Hartford and local preservationists are working to save this spacious carriage house, which must be moved as part of the plan for the town’s new public middle school. It was built to complement the Shepard House, which was designed by prestigious Hartford architect Edward T. Hapgood and built in 1900. The house was formerly the headquarters of the Kingswood-Oxford School and is being reused as an administration building for the new school. The carriage house was added in 1917 and was designed by Cortlandt F. Luce, a West Hartford resident, who designed 12 distinctive houses on West Hill Drive including his own. A structural engineer hired by the town has determined that the building can be moved. The town plans to demolish a porte cochere and the later additions that connect the carriage house to the main house. The carriage house will then become a freestanding building. The two-story carriage house has dimensions of 30 feet by 60 feet with 3,600 square feet of floor space. The building could be rehabilitated as a private home.The first floor of the carriage house contains a three-bay garage, as well as usable raw space, which could provide an area for a kitchen and bathroom. The second floor has dramatic Palladian windows on two sides with original leaded glass that illuminate an elegant ballroom. The ballroom has high ceilings, original woodwork, and a fireplace, along with built-in bookshelves. There are also a number of small rooms on the second floor.Moving costs are estimated at about $250,000 for a move to a nearby site. There are several empty lots on Prospect Avenue that could be potential locations. The building would have to be moved onto a new foundation. The town is planning to begin demolition of the old school buildings on the site in late winter or early spring and the carriage house would have to be moved at that time.Price: $1. Anyone with a serious interest in the building should contact Ron Van Winkle, Director Community Services Department, Town Of West Hartford, (860) 523-3284.  For historical information contact Mary Donohue, Chair, West Hartford Historic District Commission, (860) 523-5158.

HPX Alert: Elias Bradley House, New Haven

This two story Greek Revival House is under immediate threat of demolition.  New development is planned for the site in the Westville section of New Haven and site preparation will begin shortly.  The owner has agreed to allow the house to be moved to another property in order to save it from destruction, but the time frame is very tight.  The deadline is October 22, 2003.Elias Bradley was part owner of a nineteenth-century milling operation that was located nearby.  He built this house in 1835.  It has pleasing proportions and a number of characteristic Greek Revival features.  The gable end faces the street with a full triangular pediment.  A one-story portico creates a focal point and shelters the entrance.  Two fluted Doric columns rest on brick steps.  The first- and second-story windows retain the original six-over-six sash, while a typical rectangular window appears in the pediment.  Clapboard sheathes the exterior and the foundation is made of cut stone block.  Price: $1.00.Contact: Luda at Matthews Ventures 203-562-1000.

Ernst House, Norwalk

This stately Neoclassical mansion was built in 1908 for George Ernst, an important collector of early American furniture. It is now owned by Norwalk Hospital. Located on Elmcrest Terrace overlooking South Norwalk and the harbor, the building is one of a row of three large houses built in the late nineteenth-century. Known locally as the “Three Sisters,” they are reminders of the grand architecture of a once wealthy and prestigious residential neighborhood. The other two buildings, which stand to the left of the Ernst House are excellent examples of the Queen Anne style and are now used as apartment and rooming houses. A parking lot for Norwalk Hospital is located to the right. The house is under imminent threat of demolition for more parking, but the hospital has allowed a short reprieve while preservationists seek a buyer for the house and lot. If the hospital can recoup its purchase costs by selling the house quickly, it will forgo using the site and will expand its parking capacity elsewhere.Constructed of brick on a granite base, the building was designed to provide a setting for Ernst’s extraordinary collection of early American furniture and decorative objects. The academic precision of the architectural details reflects his knowledge of history. An impressive two-story portico with four Doric columns lends grandeur to the facade. A second-story balcony rests above an elaborate front door, and dentils trim the pediment, which contains a semi-elliptical window. The main roof is tile, while slate is used on some of the additions. These were probably added by Ernst himself soon after the house was built and are in keeping with the original concept. The rearmost addition suggests a brick one-story kitchen ell of a type seen in the South. A freestanding low brick wall encloses a rectangular plot for a kitchen garden and remains as a landscape feature behind the house. Ernst was a pioneer in the appreciation of American decorative arts and amassed his collection before it became fashionable.The interior retains many interesting features including a mantel derived from the work of Christopher Wren and accurately referenced Federal style moldings. The building has been vacant for about a year. It was most recently used as doctors’ offices and could become an office complex again or a multi-family residence.  The building contains 6,000 square feet of floor space, which could be augmented by constructing an addition if needed. Price: $925,000. Contact: Norwalk Preservation Trust, 203-899-0480.

Worthington Meeting House, Berlin

The Town of Berlin is requesting proposals for the rehabilitation of this eighteenth-century building on a half-acre lot at the northernmost point within the Worthington Ridge Historic District. The town will consider selling or leasing the building. Constructed in 1774 as a large meetinghouse, the building served as a school and administrative offices from 1908 until 1973. The interior was largely gutted in the 1970s and the plaster removed from the walls. The work halted and the interior remains in a completely unfinished state. Original oak and chestnut timbers survive.  The exterior is sheathed in clapboard with a wood shingle roof. The twenty-over-twenty double-hung windows are 1970s’ replacements. All the doors were replaced at the same time. Some of the windows have already deteriorated, and the building requires extensive repair and rehabilitation throughout. The footprint measures 45 feet deep by 62 feet long. The area is zoned for single-family residential use, but the town will consider other uses, such as professional offices. As a contributing structure within a historic district listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the building may be eligible for a twenty-percent federal historic-preservation tax credit for rehabilitation of income producing propertiesDeadline for proposals: February 14, 2003, at 11:00 AM. For further information call Bonnie L. Therrien, Town Manager, 860-838-7002.

Hubbard Farm, Middletown

This evocative farm, which was established by one of Middletown’s founding families, is threatened by a subdivision proposal. An eighteenth-century house rests on a small hill surrounded by lilacs and mature maple trees. An eighteenth-century barn, other outbuildings, and a fenced-in paddock create a traditional barnyard. The Hubbards called the farm “Green Hill.” Due to the historical importance of Hubbard Farm and its high degree of authenticity, the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission imposed a one-year moratorium on developing the one-acre parcel that contains the principal buildings and the paddock. The commission wanted to allow time for a buyer to emerge who would retain the buildings, paddock, and farm-like character of the property. The existing eighteenth-century house incorporates parts of an earlier watch house, built in 1675, when Middletown colonists needed protection. In a most unusual combination, much of the first floor retains the seventeenth-century brownstone exterior of the watch house, while the rest of the house is sheathed in clapboard. The house was built with a center chimney and a second-story overhang on the front and side. The east side retains a gable overhang as well. A double-attic roof-framing system, which is an unusual structural feature, remains above the second story. Although the actual floorboards to the second attic have been removed, all the early structural members remain. A two-story bay window was added around 1868. The interior retains many historic features including wide-board floors, paneled fireplace walls, and wainscoting.For further information on purchasing the property contact Dennis Amato at 203-671-9234. For further information on the history of Hubbard Farm go to http://hubbardfarm.freehomepage.com or call Carolyn Laban at 860-344-8926. Price: $440,000.

House and Country Store, Seymour

This one-and-a-half-story house was probably built around 1800. At present, it is engulfed in over-grown vegetation and in serious need of stabilization. An addition that is approximately 45 years old has collapsed and exposed the building to the weather at the rear.  Fortunately, the earlier core building still remains dry, with no evidence of leaks. The roof on the front entry porch has also given way, but this is not an original feature. Local lore says that the house was built in the seventeenth century, but the construction techniques do not support such an early date. The remains of another building foundation are said to exist on the property, which may mark the spot of an earlier house that became confused with this one over time.The owners, who live on a separate parcel directly behind this house, want to see it restored, but cannot afford to do the work themselves due to their limited income from Social Security. They are considering selling the house along with a country store that stands adjacent to it on the same lot.  They would also consider a partnership or any other proposal. The store was built about 50 years ago and has a spacious six room apartment on the second floor, which is in much better condition, but lacks heat. The store is now operated on a very limited basis, but has the potential to bring in substantial income as the only store on Route 334, a well-traveled state road. The existence of the apartment would allow someone to live there while restoring the house. For further information please call Mrs. Nightingale, 203-735-4902.

Deming House, Litchfield

This house, built in 1884, stands in a land-locked position behind a nursing home in the Litchfield Historic District. The district is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The house originally fronted North Street, but was moved back in the 1960s, when the bank next door acquired the site for parking. Apple Health Care now owns both the Deming House and the skilled nursing facility, Rose Haven. The company plans to build an addition to the nursing home and would like to find someone to remove the Deming House from the property and restore it at another location. Although aluminum siding hides the window surrounds and other architectural details, the Deming House retains its graceful form and asymmetrical massing. The aluminum siding covers the first and second stories, but dormers at the attic level are still sheathed in board and batten siding. Originally, the dormers were also accented with Stick-style decorative trusses. At present, the interior contains three rental units. Apple Health Care will allow approximately six months for removal of the Deming House from the Rose Haven property. Price: $1.Contact: Jamick Szefer, 860-678-9755.

888 Mill Hill Terrace, Southport

This small late-nineteenth-century vernacular house is on the market in the Mill Hill neighborhood and may become a victim of the destructive teardown trend. The area is experiencing development pressure, and the building is endangered by its small size and the desirability of the land it occupies. The house has a front porch with decorative brackets at the sides (not visible in photo). Wood shingles sheath the exterior, and the foundation is made of fieldstone. The interior has oak and pine floors.  The building contains 1,130 square feet of floor space and stands on a parcel of about one and a half acres. The property is primarily open and sunny, with a wooded glen and a stream at the rear. Two sides of the lot retain stonewalls. There is also a nineteenth-century outhouse on the property.The location is about one mile from the historic village of Southport and Southport Harbor. Price: $539,000Contact: Norman Marsilius, 203-255-3449.

Wyllys Russell House and Barn, Branford

Built in 1820, this two-story house retains a high degree of authenticity. It is located in an area known since colonial times as Canoe Brook. Today the neighborhood is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as the Canoe Brook Historic District. The owners of the Russell House are offering the building free of charge to anyone who will use a properly licensed contractor to remove the building from the property for restoration elsewhere. Seventeen condominium units are proposed for the site. The house is of post and beam construction and wood shingles sheath the exterior. A one-story portico forms the focal point of the symmetrical facade, which has two windows on either side of the entry on the first floor and five windows across the second story. Two columns support a shallow hipped roof over the front door. The door is paneled with a four-light transom above. It is flanked by pilasters. The windows were converted to two-over-two sash later in the nineteenth century. The brick center chimney serves three fireplaces. The interior remains largely intact, primarily due to the fact that only two families have occupied the house since its construction. Wyllys and Laura Russell built the house on land that had been conveyed to them by Laura’s mother in 1816. Wyllys Russell lived there for at least fifty years. Frederick S. Jordon bought the house in 1875, and his daughter, Caroline, occupied it until her death in 1989. At present, the building is owned by Caroline Jordon’s heirs. In addition to the house, the property contains a nineteenth-century barn that needs to be relocated. The barn has a hayloft. The barn’s dimensions are approximately 29 feet by 25 feet. The house contains approximately 2,100 square feet of floor space. Contact: Joe FitzGerald, RE/MAX Alliance, 203-781-8858.

Rockwell School, New Britain

The City of New Britain is offering this nineteenth-century brick building located on Franklin Square for sale. Built around 1867 as a school, it was named for Reverend Samuel Rockwell, who served as the first minister of the South Congregational Church and represented the city in the Connecticut General Assembly. In the 1940s, Central Connecticut State College (then the Teachers College of Connecticut) leased the building for its Departments of English and Social Sciences after several years of disuse. It subsequently served as a courthouse, and as such was a prominent civic building anchoring the corner of Franklin Square. Now Rockwell School has been vacant since 1998.The building is constructed of brick with brownstone trim, which was quarried in nearby Portland. An 1892 photograph shows a square Italianate entry porch and a square central bell tower on the roof. The entrance was changed when the building served as a courthouse, and the tower has been removed. The porch now has a flat roof supported by three Tuscan columns at each corner. Drawings of the bell tower exist, making its future restoration a possibility. Arched windows appear on the second story in pairs, and decorative brackets support the roof. Coffered ceilings enhance the interior.Franklin Square is a triangular park that has recently undergone restoration and contains trees, statuary, and benches. A well-known statue of the Goddess of Peace stands at the park’s southern end, across from Rockwell School. The square is surrounded by churches and former civic buildings now converted for a variety of uses. The area is on the edge of New Britain’s downtown and blends into a residential district of large nineteenth-century houses. The Rockwell School building contains almost 24,000 square feet of floor space and a full-size elevator. It is zoned for office/professional use and would be best suited to become a corporate headquarters or a multi-tenant office building. The asking price is negotiable and will be based on future use. Prospective buyers will need to demonstrate the financial ability to complete the restoration of the building. Contact: Downtown District Director Don Courtemanche at 860-229-1665, extension 15.Information is also available at http://www.newbritaindd.com.

Rockwell School, New Britain

The City of New Britain is offering this nineteenth century brick building located on Franklin Square for sale. Built around 1867 as a school, it was named for Reverend Samuel Rockwell, who served as the first minister of the South Congregational Church and represented the city in the Connecticut General Assembly. In the 1940s, Central Connecticut State College (then the Teachers College of Connecticut) leased the building for its Departments of English and Social Sciences after several years of disuse. It subsequently served as a court house, and as such was a prominent civic building anchoring the corner of Franklin Square. Now Rockwell School has been vacant since 1998.The building is constructed of brick with brownstone trim, which was quarried in nearby Portland. An 1892 photograph shows a square Italianate entry porch and a square central bell tower on the roof. The entrance was changed when the building served as a courthouse, and the tower has been removed. The porch now has a flat roof supported by three Tuscan columns at each corner. Drawings of the bell tower exist, making its future restoration a possibility. Arched windows appear on the second story in pairs, and decorative brackets support the roof. Coffered ceilings enhance the interior.Franklin Square is a triangular park that has recently undergone restoration and contains trees, statuary, and benches. A well-known statue of the Goddess of Peace stands at the park’s southern end, across from Rockwell School. The square is surrounded by churches and former civic buildings now converted for a variety of uses. The area is on the edge of New Britain’s downtown and blends into a residential district of large nineteenth-century houses. The Rockwell School building contains almost 24,000 square feet of floor space and a full-size elevator. It is zoned for office/professional use and would be best suited to become a corporate headquarters or a multi-tenant office building. The asking price is negotiable and will be based on future use. Prospective buyers will need to demonstrate the financial ability to complete the restoration of the building. Contact: Downtown District Director Don Courtemanche at 860-229-1665, extension 15.Information is also available at http://www.newbritaindd.com.

414 High Street, Willimantic

This two-story house stands at the north entrance to Eastern Connecticut State University. The university plans to build a campus police station on the site and is looking for a person or organization that would move the building and restore it elsewhere. Officials feel that the residential nature of the structure makes it difficult to use it for the university’s needs. Records indicate that the land for the present site was sold to a farmer, Borintha Crowell, in 1842, but the house is likely to have a later date. The gable end of the house faces the street, and decorative trusses appear at the peaks of the gables. The second-story window crowns are incised with a scroll design. The interior of the house features generous sized rooms with abundant natural light. The first floor has an asymmetrical plan with two large rooms off of the main entry, one of which features a bay window. The main entry hall still has the original staircase with mahogany balusters and railing, as well as a front door with a segmented arch above. The windows are large, with two-over two sash. The university is willing to give the house to the right individual or organization. For further information call Nancy Tinker, Director of Facilities Management and Planning, at 860-465-5348.

Hubbard Farm, Middletown

This evocative farm, which was established by one of Middletown’s founding families, is threatened by a subdivision proposal. An eighteenth-century house rests on a small hill surrounded by lilacs and mature maple trees. An eighteenth-century barn, other outbuildings, and a fenced-in paddock create a traditional barnyard. The Hubbards called the farm “Green Hill.” Due to the historical importance of Hubbard Farm and its high degree of authenticity, the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission imposed a one-year moratorium on developing the one-acre parcel that contains the principal buildings and the paddock. The commission wanted to allow time for a buyer to emerge who would retain the buildings, paddock, and farm-like character of the property. The existing eighteenth-century house incorporates parts of an earlier watch house, built in 1675, when Middletown colonists needed protection. In a most unusual combination, much of the first floor retains the seventeenth-century brownstone exterior of the watch house, while the rest of the house is sheathed in clapboard. The house was built with a center chimney and a second-story overhang on the front and side. The east side retains a gable overhang as well. A double-attic roof-framing system, which is an unusual structural feature, remains above the second story. Although the actual floorboards to the second attic have been removed, all the early structural members remain. A two-story bay window was added around 1868. The interior retains many historic features including wide-board floors, paneled fireplace walls, and wainscoting.For further information on purchasing the property contact Dennis Amato at 203-671-9234. For further information on the history of Hubbard Farm go to http://hubbardfarm.freehomepage.com or call Carolyn Laban at 860-344-8926. Price: $440,000.

Deming House, Litchfield

This house, built in 1884, stands in a landlocked position behind a nursing home in the Litchfield Historic District. The district is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The house originally fronted North Street, but was moved back in the 1960s, when the bank next door acquired the site for parking. Apple Health Care now owns both the Deming House and the skilled nursing facility, Rose Haven. The company plans to build an addition to the nursing home and would like to find someone to remove the Deming House from the property and restore it at another location. Although aluminum siding hides the window surrounds and other architectural details, the Deming House retains its graceful form and asymmetrical massing. The aluminum siding covers the first and second stories, but dormers at the attic level are still sheathed in board and batten siding. Originally, the dormers were also accented with Stick-style decorative trusses. At present, the interior contains three rental units. Apple Health Care will allow approximately six months for removal of the Deming House from the Rose Haven property.Price: $1. Contact: Jamick Szefer, 860-678-9755.

414 High Street, Willimantic

This two-story house stands at the north entrance to Eastern Connecticut State University. The university plans to build a campus police station on the site and is looking for a person or organization that would move the building and restore it elsewhere. Officials feel that the residential nature of the structure makes it difficult to use it for the university’s needs. Records indicate that the land for the present site was sold to a farmer, Borintha Crowell, in 1842, but the house is likely to have a later date. The gable end of the house faces the street, and decorative trusses appear at the peaks of the gables. The second-story window crowns are incised with a scroll design. The interior of the house features generous sized rooms with abundant natural light. The first floor has an asymmetrical plan with two large rooms off of the main entry, one of which features a bay window. The main entry hall still has the original staircase with mahogany balusters and railing, as well as a front door with a segmented arch above. The windows are large, with two-over-two sash. The university is willing to give the house to the right individual or organization.For further information call Nancy Tinker, Director of Facilities Management and Planning, at 860-465-5348.

HPX Alert: Baker-Sabo House, Ashford

The Town of Ashford is accepting bids to remove the 18th century, two story colonial farmhouse known as the Baker-Sabo House, or Baker House on 25 Pompey Hollow Road, Ashford. The Building Committee is hoping that someone will come forward to move or carefully disassemble and then reassemble the structure. The State Register house is located adjacent to the Knowlton Town Hall, a National Register building, in the downtown historic area. The c. 1814 colonial has an attic and is of post and bean construction. Notable features of the building include original curled leaf door latches and mantle chimney cupboards above and flanking a fireplace mantle. The house’s most ornate mantelpiece shows simple molded architrave trim around the fireplace opening, with a plain paneled frieze above, surmounted by a few plain moldings and a shelf.  Bids must be received on or before 3:00 PM August 12, 2003. Please contact the Town Clerk’s office at Knowlton Hall, 860-429-7044.

HPX Update: Ernst House, Norwalk

In an exciting reversal, Norwalk Hospital has agreed to sell the Ernst House and pursue parking alternatives suggested by the Norwalk Preservation Trust. The 1908 Neoclassical mansion stands next door to a hospital parking lot and was under threat of demolition for expanded parking. The building was listed in the July/August 2003 issue of the Exchange after efforts of local preservationists resulted in a short reprieve. The hospital decided that it would forgo using the site and would expand its parking capacity elsewhere, if it could sell the property quickly and recoup its purchase costs. The price tag exceeded $900,000, a large sum to attain in a lackluster economy within a tight time frame.Amidst the publicity on the plight of the building, a qualified buyer emerged who wanted to preserve and reuse the house as mixed-income housing with 30 percent allocated to affordable housing. Although promising, there was a serious gap between offer and asking price. The Norwalk Preservation Trust mobilized immediately and raised $27,000 in pledges in 48 hours. Paul Newman, a resident of next-door Westport, stepped in with a generous gift of $20,000, helping the cause with both his money and his name. Norwalk Mayor Alex Knopp aided the effort immensely by facilitating the use of $150,000 in affordable housing funds through the Norwalk Redevelopment Authority.State Senator Bob Genuario served as the attorney for the buyer, Andrew Kydes, and helped to produce a successful outcome. The stately mansion was built for George Ernst, an important collector of early American furniture. Constructed of brick on a granite base, the building was designed to provide a setting for Ernst’s extraordinary collection of early American furniture and decorative objects. An impressive two-story portico with four Doric columns lends grandeur to the facade. A second-story balcony rests above an elaborate front door. Dentils trim the pediment, which contains a semi-elliptical window. The interior retains many interesting features including a mantel derived from the work of Christopher Wren and accurate Federal style moldings. Ernst was a pioneer in the appreciation of American decorative arts and amassed his collection before it became fashionable.Mr. Kydes is an experienced local contractor and is committed to preserving the building’s historic character. The Norwalk Preservation Trust will have input on the rehabilitation plans. This public/private bipartisan effort saves not only an important building, but a historic neighborhood, as well.Loss of the Ernst House would have endangered two significant Queen Anne houses on adjacent properties.The row of three large houses built in the late nineteenth-century, starting with the Ernst House, is known locally as the “Three Sisters.” Now these reminders of the grand architecture of a once wealthy and prestigious residential neighborhood are safe.

Deming House, Litchfield

This house, built in 1884, stands in a land-locked position behind a nursing home in the Litchfield Historic District. The district is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The house originally fronted North Street, but was moved back in the 1960s, when the bank next door acquired the site for parking. Apple Health Care now owns both the Deming House and the skilled nursing facility, Rose Haven. The company plans to build an addition to the nursing home and would like to find someone to remove the Deming House from the property and restore it at another location. Although aluminum siding hides the window surrounds and other architectural details, the Deming House retains its graceful form and asymmetrical massing. The aluminum siding covers the first and second stories, but dormers at the attic level are still sheathed in board and batten siding. Originally, the dormers were also accented with Stick-style decorative trusses. At present, the interior contains three rental units. Apple Health Care will allow approximately six months for removal of the Deming House from the Rose Haven property.Price: $1. Contact: Jamick Szefer, 860-678-9755.

Hamlin House, Plainville

The Town of Plainville is looking for someone to save this eighteenth-century house from demolition by moving it to another location.  Its present site is slated for commercial development.  The two-story house has a gambrel roof, which creates a spacious attic.  The building is of post and bean construction and much of the framing is oak.  The dimensions are approximately 25 by 40 feet.  The photo was taken around 1918.Phineas and Rhoda Hamlin moved into the house in 1785.  Chauncey Porter, a community leader, occupied it in 1816.  It was the scene of a murder in 1943, giving an unfortunate aspect to the history of this interesting building.  Most recently, it served in a much happier role- as a bookstore.Several additions have been built over the lifetime of the house, which may not lend themselves to being moved with the original structure.  The site must be completely cleared and the basement filled in by June 1 of this year.The Town of Plainville does not own nor does it have any financial interest in this property.  It is the intention of the town to assist the private owner in finding a qualified party to move the building off site.  Price: $1.  Deadline: June 1, 2006.  Contact: Plainville Town Manager, Robert Lee, 860-793-0221.

Lockwood Outbuilding, Norwalk

This nineteenth-century outbuilding was part of the Deacon Charles Lockwood homestead in the old Borough of Norwalk. It needs to be moved to another site due to a development plan that will save and rehabilitate a row of three historic houses located at the front of the property. Two of the houses are associated with the Lockwood family, one of Norwalk’s founding families.

At present, the outbuilding contains two apartments. Its former use is not known with certainty. Built into the side of a bank, the one-and-a-half story structure may have served as a stable or as servants’ quarters or a combination of both. The basement level has a small fireplace with iron fittings for cooking, which indicates that at least part of the building has a residential use historically.

The building is approximately 40 feet long and was probably constructed in two stages, with the section to the right being earlier. It is sheathed in clapboard and is of post and beam construction with house, an in-law apartment, a barn or a garage. While the owner would like to see the building saved, due to practical considerations, quick responses would be greatly appreciated. Price: $1, Contact: Bill Kraus, 203-899-0480.

Roxbury Station, Roxbury

Commerical zoning and high property values are endangering a group of historic buildings on the scenic Shepaug River in the rural Town of Roxbury. As the only commerically-zoned area in the community, the complex, known as Roxbury Station, has attracte the interest of developers who want to tear down the buildings. However, reuse of the structures could result in an appealing retail complex that would fit into the picturesque surroundings along Route 67, a state-designated Scenic Road. The property is adjacent to a preserve containing the impressive stone remains of a nineteenth-century blast furnace.

Roxbury Station was a stop on the Shepaug Railroad, which was completed in 1872. Today the depot appears to be in good condition and retains quite a bit of authenticity. It has lost its platform, but original six-over-six windows remain, as well as loading doors and passenger doors. It has vertical-board siding. One end of the building was used for freight and the other end for passenger service.

Behind the depot, built into a rise in the land, stands a large, nineteenth-century warehouse. The building has two main floors and an attic. The parcel also includes a large, long lumber shed and a barn. The Shepaug River borders the property and flows over a low dam, creating a scenic waterfall.

The listing agent, Bonnie Bevans, has a love for her childhood hometown of Roxbury and hopes to find a buyer who will preserve the buildings.

Price: $1.9 million

Contact: Bonnie Bevans, William Raveis Real Estate, 860-488-3624.

Sperry House, New Haven

This two-and-a-half story house is located on a commercial area on a busy section of Whalley Avenue. Although the house is in fair condition, the location puts it in danger of being torn down and replaced with a commercial structure.

The house may date to the 1830s. It has a low-pitched roof with the gable facing the street. Some remodeling in the Italianate style was probably done later in the nineteenth century. The wondows are a mixture of six-over-one and six-over-six sashes, with simple, flat window surrounds. A pair of arched Italianate windows appear in the gable. The triple window on the first floor facade is a twentieth-century alteration, as is the entryway. A historical photo shows an Italianate front porch with decorative brackets.

Gay Sperry, a bookkeeper with the New Have Bank, built the house. He bought the land from the Osborn family, whose homestead was located nearby in the early nineteenth century.

The house needs updating. It contains twelve rooms, which could become attractive offices. At present, it is configured as a two-famioy residence.

Lot size: .6

Price: $399,000

Contact: Teresa Sirico 203-469-5330

Toll House, Franklin

Known locally as the 1801 Toll House, this interesting building originally sat very close to the road linking Norwich and Willimantic, now Route 32.  It operated as a toll house in the nineteenth century.  The road bed was later moved about twenty-five feet away.The exterior is covered in clapboard, and the building retains early interior doors and some wide-board floors.  It is constructed of hand-hewn timbers, some of which display Roman numerals cut into the wood near the mortise and tenon joints.  These marks are characteristic of timber frame construction and showed which timbers were to be joined together.  This assembly method used Roman numerals so that the marks could be made with a straight tool.The current owner acquired the property in 1980.  He has not be able to maintain it for financial reasons and is looking for someone to move the building off his property, who would restore it on another site.  All costs would be the responsibility of the mover. Contact: Gary Young, 860-642-7559.

Toll House, Franklin

Known locally as the 1801 Toll House, this interesting building originally sat very close to the road linking Norwich and Willimantic, now Route 32.  It operated as a toll house in the nineteenth century.  The road bed was later moved about twenty-five feet away.The exterior is covered in clapboard, and the building retains early interior doors and some wide-board floors.  It is constructed of hand-hewn timbers, some of which display Roman numerals cut into the wood near the mortise and tenon joints.  These marks are characteristic of timber frame construction and showed which timbers were to be joined together.  This assembly method used Roman numerals so that the marks could be made with a straight tool.The current owner acquired the property in 1980.  He has not be able to maintain it for financial reasons and is looking for someone to move the building off his property, who would restore it on another site.  All costs would be the responsibility of the mover. Contact: Gary Young, 860-642-7559.

Lockwood Outbuilding, Norwalk

This nineteenth-century outbuilding was part of the Deacon Charles Lockwood homestead in the old Borough of Norwalk.  It needs to be moved to another site due to a development plan that will save and rehabilitate a row of three historic houses located at the front of the property.  Two of the houses are associated with the Lockwood family, one of Norwalk’s founding families.At present, the outbuilding contains two apartments.  Its former use is not known with certainty.  Built into the side of a bank, the one-and-a-half story structure may have served as a stable or as servants’ quarters or a combination of both.  The basement level has a small fireplace with iron fittings for cooking, which indicates that at least part of the building has a residential use historically.The building is approximately 40 feet long and was probably constructed in two stages, with the section to the right being earlier.  It is sheathed in clapboard and is of post and beam construction with house, an in-law apartment, a barn or a garage.  While the owner would like to see the building saved, due to practical considerations, quick responses would be greatly appreciated.  Price: $1, Contact: Bill Kraus, 203-899-0480.

Mason Hamilton Post House, Essex

This vernacular farmhouse, built around 1830, will face demolition unless it is moved to another location.  The original portion of the two-story house is a twenty by twenty-five foot block with the gable end facing the street.  A one-story lean-to stands at the rear.  Two later additions were built sometime before 1929.  A front porch adds neighborhood quality.The house is associated with families of local prominence.  When Mason Hamilton Post, the first owner, wed Rebecca Hayden in 1829, he married into a family with extensive land holdings.  This allowed him to become the prime developer of Maple Avenue.  Three generations of the Doane family occupied the house for most of the twentieth century.  Charles Doane, Jr., was the Essex Postmaster and a selectman.The building is reported to have dry rot and termite damage.  These conditions can often be remedied.  The house needs to be moved on a tight deadline.  Contact: Charles Doane III, 860-767-1562.

Lockwood Outbuilding, Norwalk

This nineteenth-century outbuilding was part of the Deacon Charles Lockwood homestead in the old Borough of Norwalk.  It needs to be moved to another site due to a development plan that will save and rehabilitate a row of three historic houses located at the front of the property.  Two of the houses are associated with the Lockwood family, one of Norwalk’s founding families.At present, the outbuilding contains two apartments.  Its former use is not known with certainty.  Built into the side of a bank, the one-and-a-half story structure may have served as a stable or as servants’ quarters or a combination of both.  The basement level has a small fireplace with iron fittings for cooking, which indicates that at least part of the building has a residential use historically.The building is approximately 40 feet long and was probably constructed in two stages, with the section to the right being earlier.  It is sheathed in clapboard and is of post and beam construction with house, an in-law apartment, a barn or a garage.  While the owner would like to see the building saved, due to practical considerations, quick responses would be greatly appreciated.  Price: $1, Contact: Bill Kraus, 203-899-0480.

Margaret Hoyt Smith House, Rowayton

Built around 1875, this large, gracious house later became the home of Margaret Hoyt Smith, a prominent Norwalk architect.  She remodeled the interior in the 1950s into a very livable space reflecting Colonial Revival taste, while retaining original woodwork and other details.  The result is sympathetic mixture of styles from two different centuries.The house is located on a bluff with magnificent views of Long Island Sound.  On a clear day Long Island itself is visible.  This extraordinary site has endangered the house.  The property is slated to be developed with several new houses.  Despite the fact that the Hoyt House is in good condition, it is not part of the new plan.  The developer is offering the house for $1 if moved to another location.  It was relocated once before, when John Farrell, president of U.S.Steel, had it moved about 300 feet and turned it to face the water.  He decided to build a new house on the original site of the Hoyt House.The Hoyt House has a square tower and a one-story, wrap-around porch with turned supports.  Bands of fish-scale shingles enliven the surface of the tower.  The rest of the building is covered in clapboard.  The house has three stories of living space, including an exceptional bedroom at the top of the tower.  Contact: Ned Brooks, 203-972-1899 or nedbrooks@optonline.net.

Rhodes House, Fairfield

This two-story, wood-frame house was built in 1809 and displays a simple New England dignity. Cedar shingles covered in gray paint clad the exterior. The first-floor windows have six-over-six sashes, while the smaller windows upstairs have nine-over-six sashes. The building rests on a fieldstone foundation.

Located on a corner parcel in the Greenfield Hill section of Fairfield, the Rhodes house is one of few surviving examples of its type in Fairfield. The original portion of the house contains the front door and the two windows to the right on both stories. The two-story section to the left of the entrance is an early addition, as is the one-story section beyond it. The wrought-iron railings at the entrance and the aluminum awning are obvious modern attachments and could be easily removed. This would leave an authentic early-nineteenth-century dwelling.

One family has owned this house for almost 100 years. It has four fireplaces and retains early interior features, such as wide-board floors. Nothing is known about the original owner, James Rhodes, except that he owned land in Fairfield in the early nineteenth century and built this house. Stone walls line the road frontage of the two-acre property, which contains mature trees and shrubs and a picturesque pond. A barn, an outhouse, and a stone well add to the classic New England atmosphere. The barn has badly weathered vertical-board siding, but is protected from the elements by tar paper. Beside it a stone foundation remains from another barn, now removed.

The house needs rehabilitation. It contains approximately 1,800 square feet of floor space. Fortunately, it is not being marketed as a teardown. However, the risk of such a fate is great in southern Fairfield County, where historic houses are too often demolished when located on desirable property. Contact: Doris Rowe, Coldwell Banker Real Estate, 203-227-1269. Price: $795,000.

Sperry House, New Haven

This two-and-a-half story house is located on a commercial area on a busy section of Whalley Avenue. Although the house is in fair condition, the location puts it in danger of being torn down and replaced with a commercial structure.

The house may date to the 1830s. It has a low-pitched roof with the gable facing the street. Some remodeling in the Italianate style was probably done later in the nineteenth century. The wondows are a mixture of six-over-one and six-over-six sashes, with simple, flat window surrounds. A pair of arched Italianate windows appear in the gable. The triple window on the first floor facade is a twentieth-century alteration, as is the entryway. A historical photo shows an Italianate front porch with decorative brackets.

Gay Sperry, a bookkeeper with the New Have Bank, built the house. He bought the land from the Osborn family, whose homestead was located nearby in the early nineteenth century.

The house needs updating. It contains twelve rooms, which could become attractive offices. At present, it is configured as a two-famioy residence.

Lot size: .6

Price: $399,000

Contact: Teresa Sirico 203-469-5330

Roxbury Station, Roxbury

Commercial zoning and high property values are endangering a group of historic buildings on the scenic Shepaug River in the rural Town of Roxbury. As the only commercially-zoned area in the community, the complex known as Roxbury Station has attracted the interest of developers who want to tear down the buildings. However, reuse of the structures would result in an appealing retail complex taht would fit into the picturesque surroundings along Route 67, a state-designated Scenic Road.

Roxbury Station was a stop on the Shepaug Railroad, which was completed in 1872. The line ran from the Hawleyville section of Newtown to Litchfield. In the book Country Depots in the Connecticut Hills, Robert F. Lord and his co-authors say, "The Shepaug Railroad made a host of friends and very little money as it wound its way through the beautiful Litchfield hills." After struggling to maintain its autonomy through two foreclosures and reorganizations, the railroad became part of the New York, New Haven & Hartford system in 1898. It then ran for 50 more years. Although the Shepaug Railroad wrestled with its own finances in the nineteenth century, it was a boon to a number of industries in Roxbury including quarrying, dairy, and beef.

Today, the depot appears to be in good condition and retains quite a bit of authenticity. It has lost its platform, but retains original six-over-six windows, as well as loading doors. It has vertical-board siding. One end of the building was used for freight and the other for passenger service. Where the present monochrome beige color scheme has chipped slightly, the building shows evidence of red paint with white trim from its days as a working railroad stations.

Behind the depot, built into a rise in the land, stands a large nineteenth-century warehouse. It has vertical board siding on the front and clapboard on the side. An elevated porch with a second floor entry, which appears in historic photos, is located at the northeast end of the front facade. The building has two main floors and an attic. Tracks used to run between this building and the depot.

Across a small road that runs perpendicular to Route 67 (Mine Hill), there is a nineteenth-century general store, now adapted as a residence, which is also for sale as part of the complex. This building predates the railroad. In addition, the three-and-a-half acre parcel includes a large, long lumber shed and a barn. The Shepaug River borders the property and flows over a low dam, creating a scenic waterfall.

The listing agent, Bonnie Bevans, has a love for her childhood hometown of Roxbury and hopes to find a buyer who will preserve the buildings. She is also willing to organize a consortium of interested people to buy the property and adapt the buildings for appropriate commercial uses. She would contribut $10,000 of her own money to the effort, if others would join her.

Price: $2,200,000. Contact: Bonnie Bevans, William Raveis International, 860-488-3624.

MARCEL BREUER HOUSE IN NEW CANAAN

"Breuer II" (1951) the second house Marcel Breuer designed for his family in New Canaan, Connecticut was purchased by a developer this summer and has been put back on the market temporarily. If no buyer is found the house will be demolished to make way for a new, larger house.

The 4,264 sq. ft. house has 4 bedrooms, 4 full and one half baths. It has a detached carport, pool and pool house. The single story house incorporates Breuer’s signature stone walls and extensive glazing to take advantage of the beautifully wooded site. Listing price: $2,895,000 Listing agent is Carol Pelzner, Country Living Associates, (203) 966-7800.

David Field House, Madison

This classic New England saltbox dates from the first half of the eighteenth-century. It has a center chimney and a symmetrical facade. The exterior is sided with narrow clapboard. Both the foun­dation and the chimney are constructed of fieldstone. Most of the windows have eight-over-twelve sashes. The center window above the front door is narrower with a six-over-nine arrangement. The entry vestibule is a later addition. The house is of post and beam construction. Physical evidence in the roof framing suggests that its saltbox form developed as a result of a lean-to added at the rear, rather than as an integral part of the original structure. Although the interior is in neglected condition, it contains a number of notable early features, such as raised-panel doors, wide-board floors, and a paneled wall next to the parlor fireplace. The Field House is listed on the State Register of Historic Places. It needs extensive restoration. The Field family had many distinguished members, including Stephen J. Field, who served the nation as a justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

The owner will consider selling the house on site at a price to be determined or will allow it to be moved elsewhere for restora­tion. Local preservationists hope that it will stay in its original location or, at least, within Madison. For further information contact the owner, Michael Montanaro, at 203-246-7340 or Jane Kuhl, president Madison Historical Society at 203-421-3050.

David Field House, Madison

This classic New England saltbox dates from the first half of the eighteenth-century. It has a center chimney and a symmetrical facade. The exterior is sided with narrow clapboard. Both the foun­dation and the chimney are constructed of fieldstone. Most of the windows have eight-over-twelve sashes. The center window above the front door is narrower with a six-over-nine arrangement. The entry vestibule is a later addition. The house is of post and beam construction. Physical evidence in the roof framing suggests that its saltbox form developed as a result of a lean-to added at the rear, rather than as an integral part of the original structure. Although the interior is in neglected condition, it contains a number of notable early features, such as raised-panel doors, wide-board floors, and a paneled wall next to the parlor fireplace. The Field House is listed on the State Register of Historic Places. It needs extensive restoration. The Field family had many distinguished members, including Stephen J. Field, who served the nation as a justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

The owner will consider selling the house on site at a price to be determined or will allow it to be moved elsewhere for restora­tion. Local preservationists hope that it will stay in its original location or, at least, within Madison. For further information contact the owner, Michael Montanaro, at 203-246-7340 or Jane Kuhl, president Madison Historical Society at 203-421-3050.

St. John’s Rectory, Bridgeport

The large, stone rectory of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Bridgeport is in need of extensive repairs. The church has applied for a demolition permit, because it is unable to spend the money to do the necessary work and the building is not essential to its needs. However, the church would prefer to find a way to keep the building standing. As yet, the right solution has not emerged and the 90-day demolition delay for historic structures has expired. Finding an organization or individual that would agree to rehabilitate the building in return for a lease at a nominal fee would be the preferred solution, as long as the proposed use of the building is compatible with the church’s mission. Time is of the essence.

The rectory is part of an important religious complex, which is located in a key position just on the edge of Bridgeport’s downtown commercial core. Along with St. John’s Church and the other buildings in the complex, the rectory is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. James Renwick, Jr., architect of the renowned St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City, designed St. John’s Church in the Gothic Revival style. Renwick was one of the country’s leading architects in the nineteenth-century. The church was completed in 1875.

In 1900 the widow of a former rector left the church a bequest to build a stone rectory in the same style as the church. Local architect Guy C. Hunt designed the substantial Gothic Revival building, which was finished in 1903. The two-and-a-half-story rectory is located on the northeast corner of the church property and oriented toward Park Avenue. A gabled pavilion projects from the front façade, and a crenellated parapet tops a stone porch. The interior was most recently used as offices. A large central hall is finished in Flemish quarter-sawn oak with a beamed ceiling. Fine detailing exists throughout.

Urgent repairs, including fixing the leaking roof, are estimated at $210,000. A second phase of necessary work is estimated at about $900,000. A third phase could bring the total project to $1.5 million depending on the amenities required. The church will consider a 99 year lease at $1 a year for the right applicant. Contact: St. John’s Episcopal Church, 203-335-2528.

HPX Update: Sovereigns Trading Company Building, New Britain

The five-story Sovereigns Trading Company building, a key structure in downtown New Britain, will be rehabilitated as luxury condominiums and a restaurant. The upper floors of the building have been vacant since the early 1960s. The last ground floor tenant was a women’s clothing shop, which closed in 1999. The building was listed in the March/April 2004 issue of the Exchange, when the city was seeking proposals for its rehabilitation and adaptive use. A team, which included representatives from the New Britain Chamber of Commerce, the New Britain Downtown District, and Banknorth, selected MRC Construction and Restoration of Dumont, New Jersey to take on the project. The New Britain City Council approved the choice. The project is expected to cost 1.4 million dollars.  MRC will restore the exterior of the building. The interior will be reconfigured for eight condominium units on the four upper floors, with retention of some original features. An upscale restaurant is expected to occupy the ground level. Work will begin in mid-August and should be completed by the winter of 2005-2006. The project will further the continued revitalization of downtown New Britain and will contribute to the historic streetscape.The Sovereigns Trading Company building was constructed in 1904 of yellow brick with limestone trim for the, a local dry goods grocer. Designed by New Britain architect William Cadwell, the facade features two vertical rows of bay windows made of pressed tin. The windows have egg and dart trim. The cornice began to fall off about ten years ago and was removed, but the name, Sovereigns Trading Company, and the date of 1904 still appear in limestone at the top of the building.

Daniel Chapman House, Redding

This eighteenth-century house of a Revolutionary War patriot needs to be moved or it will face demolition. Daniel Chapman, a soldier in the American Revolution, built the house in 1773, the year he got married. Four years later, British troops under the command of General Tryon captured him as they marched through Redding during the 1777 Raid on Danbury. He died in prison in New York City in the Sugar House, where many patriots lost their lives to disease and exposure to cold. Chapman left a young widow and an infant son behind in this house in Redding.

Chapman was from a family of early settlers of Connecticut in the seventeenth century. He had the same name as his grandfather, who was the founding minister of the Congregational Church in the Greens Farms section of what is now Westport.

The one-and-a-half story house is of post and beam construction with a hand-hewn timber frame. It has a fieldstone foundation and a center chimney of brick. Painted wood shingles sheath the exterior. The original windows have been replaced.

The present owner of the house may make a contribution to moving costs. Contact: Raymond D’Angelo, chairman Redding Preservation Society, 203-938-0240.

House, 233 Skiff Street, Hamden

This small residential structure is located in a commercial neighborhood. Town records give its date as 1940, but physical evidence suggests that it was probably built in the mid-nineteenth century and was perhaps associated with a nearby fac­tory. This house is a small one-and-a-half story structure with a rear ell that has an enclosed porch along its eastern side. The interior shows evidence of several renova­tions. A cobblestone chimney emerges from the center of the roof. Much of the exte­rior remains original. This house is offered for $1 for relocation to a new property. Contact: Dawn O’Connell, H. Pearce Real Estate. (203) 281-3400, ext. 333.

Fisherman’s Shed, Groton

This small building was constructed in the early 1900s, sometime before 1920, and served as a shed for a lobster business on the waterfront. The current owner needs to have it moved off the property in order to build a house and would prefer not to demolish the shed. It is in very good condition. Wood shingles sheath the exterior in the tradition of many seaside buildings. The shed originally had a wood shingle roof as well, but it has since been replaced with asphalt shingles. The building measures approximately twelve feet by sixteen feet and sits on a stone foundation. Inside it has wood floors and a small loft, which is accessible by ladder. A brick chimney served a wood or coal-burning stove. The shed has one window on each of its four sides. It would be relatively easy to move and would work well as a garden shed or guest cottage.Contact number: 860-961-1022.

HPX Update: Fodor Farm, Norwalk

Seven years ago the fate of Fodor Farm, Norwalk’s last remaining farm, looked grim. The city planned to build a new elementary school on the property. Three historic houses would be torn down, and the bucolic landscape would succumb to parking lots and ball fields. With the city’s permission a long attempt was made to find someone to move the main house to save it from demolition. A firm deal did not emerge, even after several listings in the Exchange and a feature in the "Save This Old House" column of This Old House Magazine. But now, after years of existing on borrowed time, Fodor Farm faces a bright future.

 A coalition led by the Norwalk Preservation Trust will implement an innovative plan to save not only the interesting early-nineteenth-century main house, but also two other neighboring historic houses and the majority of the rural landscape - and at no expense to taxpayers. The cooperative parties include such divergent partner’s as Mayor Knopp and a kindergarten class from the very school that was originally slated to be replaced by a new one at Fodor Farm. In the intervening years the school was renovated on its original site.

The buildings on the Fodor Farm property are likely to become a local historic district. The dwellings will be sold on individual parcels through a public process, and two other building lots may be created, all of which would be subject to review by the local Historic District Commission. The proceeds will fund research and documentation of the property, design and restoration of the landscape, and any improvements that would facilitate public access.

The city will retain ownership of the rest of the land. The acreage will become what the Norwalk Preservation Trust calls, "a nature center without walls." The Norwalk Trust hopes that the city will use the funds generated by the sale of the houses to restore the New England character of the landscape, including pastures and stands of native trees. Invasive plant species will be removed to help foster native plants and to create a welcoming habitat for birds. The nature center will also include trails and interpretive plaques.

The main house was built around 1802 and remodeled with steeply-pitched dormers and an octagonal cupola in the 1860s. It will remain a prominent landmark at the intersection of two of Norwalk’s early roads.

Ms. Mary Luf’s kindergarten class at Brookside School recently created a project entitled, "Save Fodor Farm," and entered it in the Norwalk Science Fair. The young students’ plan bears a striking resemblance to the Norwalk Trust’s proposal. In an outstanding achievement, the class won the city-wide contest, which included all elementary-school grade levels in Norwalk’s twelve schools. The Norwalk Trust presented Ms. Luf’s kindergarten class with its first Preservation Awareness Award, and the children will play an ongoing role in the process of protecting and maintaining Fodor Farm as a precious community resource.

HPX: November/December 2012

Historic Properties Exchange
November-December 2012

Andrews-Olney House (c. 1800)
Southington

Buyer needed by the end of the year!  Currently owned by the Southington YMCA and under temporary injunction preventing demolition until January 2013, the Andrews-Olney House on North Main Street is available for purchase and rehabilitation. The property is located in the Southington Center National Register District and identified as a contributing resource. It offers an opportunity for residential or commercial uses. Non-profit organizations interested in the property may qualify for pre-development planning grants from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and restoration funds from the State Historic Preservation Office/Department of Economic and Community Development.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider, (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org.


250 State Street
New London


This property, currently owned by a national bank, is available for purchase through a modified bid process.  No deed restrictions or minimum bids.  250 State Street is a 19,000 SF retail/office building located in downtown New London, Connecticut and includes a 1/2 acre parking lot on Washington Street that can accommodate parking for up to 42 vehicles. Property is located in a National Register district and may be eligible for state or federal tax credits.

Contact: John McCormick
               CBRE/New England
   (860) 525-9171


Gideon Seeley House (ca. 1812)
Brookfield

This early 19th century vernacular cottage was owned by several of Brookfield's prominent families and has been occupied throughout its history. It has had some additions over the years including architectural details that date from the Victorian period on both the interior and exterior. It measures approximately 1,825 square feet and is available for relocation and rehabilitation to interested parties.

Contact:  Jacqueline A. Salame, AIA
(203)775-2538
tourdeforcedesigns@charter.net


200 Litchfield Street (1900)
Torrington

This is a unique high-bay industrial building, requiring heating & plumbing to be restored. Perfect for heavy storage, it is located in the heart of a commercial/residential/apartment area within walking distance to Torrington's growing downtown area. Land is level, has railroad siding and frontage on two streets. Adjacent property is available, for a total of 9+ acres. The zoning is Downtown District with "Incentive Housing" designation. The site is directly south of Stop & Shop, JC Penney, TD Bank. Torrington officials are very interested in seeing this site put to good use.
Access the property from Rte 202/Litchfield Street. Borders Summer Street, across from Torrington Commons Shopping Plaza.
Contact: http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/17612526/200-Litchfield-Street-Torrington-CT/

Submissions for the January-February 2013 issue must be received by Friday, December 21, 2012.

HPX: September/ October 2012

Historic Properties Exchange
September – October 2012

Andrews-Olney House (c. 1800)
Southington

Currently owned by the Southington YMCA and under temporary injunction preventing demolition until January 2013, the Andrews-Olney House on North Main Street is available for purchase and rehabilitation. The property is located in the Southington Center National Register District and identified as a contributing resource. It offers an opportunity for residential or commercial uses. Non-profit organizations interested in the property may qualify for pre-development planning grants from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider, (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org.


Old Litchfield Jail
7 North Street
Litchfield 


Surplus property owned by the State of Connecticut, the Old Litchfield Jail is available for purchase and rehabilitation. It sites in a prime real estate location on the historic Litchfield green at the corner of North Street and West Street. Portions of the three-story structure date to 1812. The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, in association with Greater Litchfield Preservation Trust, funded a feasibility study for the reuse of this building which is available to interested parties.
Contact: Jane Montanaro, Preservation Services Officer, Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation at (203)562-6312 or jmontanaro@cttrust.org.

86 Lockwood Road
Greenwich

This charming 19th-century house, available for purchase and reconstruction on your site, was carefully renovated in 1995. The house boasts a lovely living room, formal dining room, den, and family room that opens out to screened porch. A first- or second-floor master bedroom is possible, with 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms in total. House measures approx. 2,200 square feet. It is being sold “as is” for $35,000. The buyer would be responsible for relocating the house and paying for any permits or other fees.

Contact: Debbie Benjamin at dlbenjamin2010@gmail.com.


Deadline for submission to the November/December 2012 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is October 26, 2012.

HPX: May/June 2012

Historic Properties Exchange
May – June 2012

Samuel Arnold Homestead (1780)
Haddam Neck

Built by master gunner Samuel Arnold in a Connecticut River village, this historic center-chimney house sits on a granite foundation, incorporates a double overhang, and retains original sash and interior details. Original fireplaces remain, and the chimney stack features unusual but solid construction. The front porch has recently been renovated and a new roof installed. Overall, the main structure of the house appears to be in very good condition with very little visual evidence of serious rot and decay. The electrical, plumbing and mechanical systems, however, are outdated and should be replaced. The interior is in need of cosmetic restoration and updating, but the house still retains most, if not all, of its original doors, flooring and millwork. Located less than half mile from the river, the house is available on two level acres on a quiet residential street in the community that “time forgot” of Haddam Neck.

Contact: James McHutchison at (860) 267-4671 (home) or jamesmchutchison@mac.com.


General Store (c. 1797)
Darien

This quaint waterfront property is prominently located in Darien’s historic district, Rings End Landing. History abounds in this lovingly cared for house originally built as a general store in the late 1700s by the Webb family. Enjoy wonderful views from almost every room enhanced by cool breezes skimming off the water. A glass-enclosed porch cantilevers over water. For more information, visit http://www.halstead.com/sale/ct/darien/94-rings-end-rd/house/98504771.

Contact: Pam Elliott, Halstead Property Connecticut, LLC, at (203) 656-6538 (office) or pelliott@halstead.com.


Forbes Diner (1957)
New Haven

As written in the New Haven Independent, “This 1957 diner has been sitting in a vacant lot near the corner of James and Humphrey Street since 2008, when it was removed from its decades-long home at 189 Forbes Ave… The diner is a ‘classic, top-of-the-line 1957 vintage Fodero diner,’ according to one diner fan site. The molded metal exterior features pink highlights and is topped with a double ring of neon tubes.” To view the full story written by Thomas MacMillan, go to http://www.newhavenindependent.org/index.php/archives/entry/diner_out_to_pasture/. 

Photo credit: Thomas MacMillan, New Haven Independent

Contact: Helmi “Mo” Ali, owner, at (203) 562-5582.


Commercial Building (c. 1906)
65 High Street
Enfield

This three story brick commercial building located at 65 High Street is listed on the State Register as part of the Thompsonville Historic District in Enfield. According the State Historic Preservation Office, it is currently pending for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places as well. Currently vacant, the building has potential development as a mixed use property as commercial/retail on the first floor and office or residential uses on the second and third floors. Historic features include embossed tin ceilings and walls, 2 fireplaces, light fixtures, split staircase to the second floor and turret. Property also contains a single-family house on Wallace Street, which is included. Rehab of this property may qualify for the Town of Enfield tax abatement program or state/federal tax credits programs. For more information, view the MLS listing at http://ctmls.mlxchange.com.


Contact: Gretchen Pfieffer-Hall
    Century 21 AllPoints Realty
    265 Hazard Avenue
    Enfield, CT  06082
    Office: (860) 745-2121
             Email: gretchenph@snet.net


               
One-Room Schoolhouse
Killingworth

The Lane District Schoolhouse is one of eight one-room schoolhouses in Killingworth, probably built around 1840.  Most recently used as a local VFW post, the group has disbanded so the  State VFW would like to dispose of the land and building. The land, about a quarter of an acre, and the building could be purchased at a very reasonable price. Alternatively, the VFW may be agreeable to giving the schoolhouse to someone willing to remove and relocate it. This would also entail removal of the later addition and remediation of the site that has asbestos and lead paint concerns.

Contact: Thomas L. Lentz, Killingworth Municipal Historian, thomas.lentz@yale.edu.


Deadline for submission to the July/August 2012 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is June 22, 2012.

HPX: March/ April 2012

Historic Properties Exchange
March – April 2012

Saltbox (c. 1717)
55 Lane Street
Shelton

Antique saltbox in need of a complete restoration including all mechanicals and some structural repair. The site borders 50+ acres of land trust property on a scenic road; prominent Huntington Center location. House has 4 fireplaces, hardwood floors, built-ins, exposed beam ceilings, walk-up attic and a detached 2-car garage with a full walk up attic. Lovely views of fields and forest and an owner motivated to sell.  For more information, go to www.YouTube.com and   www.zillow.com. Search both sites using property address.


Contact: Christine or Jerry Morgan
    Home: (309) 688-3256 or Email: ondgo2@sbcglobal.net.


Commercial Building (c. 1906)
65 High Street
Enfield

This three story brick commercial building located at 65 High Street is listed on the State Register as part of the Thompsonville Historic District in Enfield. According the State Historic Preservation Office, it is currently pending for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places as well. Currently vacant, the building has potential development as a mixed use property with commercial/retail on the first floor and office or residential uses on the second and third floors. Historic features include embossed tin ceilings and walls, 2 fireplaces, light fixtures, split staircase to the second floor and turret. Property also contains a single-family house on Wallace Street, which is included. Rehab of this property may qualify for the Town of Enfield tax abatement program or state/federal tax credits programs.

For more information, view the MLS listing at http://ctmls.mlxchange.com.


Contact: Gretchen Pfieffer-Hall
    Century 21 AllPoints Realty
    265 Hazard Avenue
    Enfield, CT  06082
    Office: (860) 745-2121
             Email: gretchenph@snet.net

Puppet House Theater
128-132 Thimble Islands Road
Branford

The Puppet House Theater, a beloved landmark in the Stony Creek/Thimble Islands National Register historic district, is available for sale. Constructed ca. 1895 as a silent movie house, the site has had a long history as a performance space for community theater groups, professional summer stock, local bands, artists, and, more recently, the famous Sicilian Puppets of Sebastiano Zappala. During WWII, however, the building was transformed for a time to accommodate a different kind of production: factory production of parachutes to aid the war effort.

Two properties on the site are being sold together as one:
#128, Puppet House Theater building (2,813 SF) and
#132, a multi-purpose building (598 SF). 
The property has potential for commercial and/or residential reuse.

Contact: Joel Gavin, GRI CCS, Senior Commercial Associate
                H. Pearce Commercial Real Estate
                393 State Street
                North Haven, CT  06473
                (203) 281-9321
                jgavin@hpearce.com
    


One-room schoolhouse
Salem

This one-room Oakdale schoolhouse is available for relocation. The property is one of eight one-room schoolhouses in the area. This schoolhouse was in service until about 1939 when the town constructed a modern school. A saltbox with a lot of charm, it has been used for the last 20 years as an herbery and for flower arranging. Structure is 24ft wide by 15ft long and in good condition. Own a piece of history for a low price! Best offer. Buyer must demonstrate ability to remove structure from the site and reconstruct it on a new site.

Contact: Angela Murawski at (860) 859-2034 or dxlxm@aol.com.

Deadline for submission to the May-June 2012 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is April 27, 2012.

HPX: January/ February 2012

Historic Properties Exchange
January – February 2012

Puppet House Theater
128-132 Thimble Islands Road
Branford

The Puppet House Theater, a beloved Stony Creek/Thimble Islands National Register Historic District landmark, is available for sale.  Constructed ca. 1895 as a silent movie house, the site has had a long history as a performance space for community theater groups, professional summer stock, local bands, artists, and, more recently, the famous Sicilian Puppets of Sebastiano Zappala. During WWII, however, the building was transformed for a time to accommodate a different kind of production: factory production of parachutes to aid the war effort.

Two properties on the site are being sold together as one:
#128, Puppet House Theater building (2,813 SF) and
#132, a multi-purpose building (598 SF). 
The property has potential for commercial and/or residential reuse.

Contact: Joel Gavin, GRI CCS, Senior Commercial Associate
                H. Pearce Commercial Real Estate
                393 State Street
                North Haven, CT  06473
                (203) 281-9321
                jgavin@hpearce.com
    


One-room schoolhouse
Salem

This one-room Oakdale schoolhouse is available for relocation.  The property is one of 8 one-room schoolhouses in the area. This schoolhouse was in service until about 1939 when the town constructed a modern school.  A saltbox with a lot of charm, it has been used for the last 20 years as an herbery and for flower arranging.  Structure is 24ft wide by 15ft long and in good condition.  Own a piece of history for a low price!  Best offer.  Buyer must demonstrate ability to remove structure from the site and reconstruct it on a new site.

Contact: Angela Murawski at (860) 859-2034 or dxlxm@aol.com.

Terry House on the Plymouth Green (c. 1800)
14 North Street, Plymouth

Situated on a knoll overlooking the Plymouth Green and opposite the First Congregational Church, the Terry House (c.1800) enjoys a prominent place in Plymouth Village and in the history of Terryville. First owned by the Terry family, renowned for their clock making, the home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Plymouth Village Historic District, and purportedly a station on the Underground Railroad. Currently configured as an approved 2-family residence, the house includes a 4-bedroom, +/-2100 sq. ft. unit in the front of the house and a 3-bedroom, +/-1300 sq. ft. unit in the rear. Historically significant millwork and chestnut floors are evident throughout the house.

The 1.22-acre wooded site contains over 200 feet of frontage on North Street, with the house positioned nicely above and away from the street. Also included on the parcel are two outbuildings: an attached 2-story woodshed and a 1500 sq. ft. detached 3-car garage with a full second floor. Zoning allows for continuation of the residential use or possible conversion to professional offices. Municipal sewer, water and natural gas are all available. 

The owner is asking $279,900, and will consider owner financing, as well as a joint venture in the rehab of this impressive residence. Particular consideration will be given to an historic restoration for affordable housing.

Contact: Vance Taylor, owner, 860-482-9695 or 860-480-3307 (cell) 

To tour the property and discuss the investment opportunities mentioned above,
all interested parties are cordially invited to attend an
OPEN HOUSE
SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 2012
1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Deadline for submission to the March-April 2012 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is February 24, 2012.