Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

Historic Properties Exchange

To list a property, to learn more about the properties listed, or to subscribe to Connecticut Preservation News contact Jane Montanaro,  at jmontanaro@cttrust.org or 203-562-6312.

Real Estate advertised is subject to the Federal Housing Act of 1968. Neither advertisers nor the Connecticut Trust are responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors contained in Historic Properties Exchange.

THE HISTORIC PROPERTIES EXCHANGE IS BEING REDESIGNED AND WILL BE UPDATED BY FALL OF 2017!

HPX Update: Ernst House, Norwalk

In an exciting reversal, Norwalk Hospital has agreed to sell the Ernst House and pursue parking alternatives suggested by the Norwalk Preservation Trust. The 1908 Neoclassical mansion stands next door to a hospital parking lot and was under threat of demolition for expanded parking. The building was listed in the July/August 2003 issue of the Exchange after efforts of local preservationists resulted in a short reprieve. The hospital decided that it would forgo using the site and would expand its parking capacity elsewhere, if it could sell the property quickly and recoup its purchase costs. The price tag exceeded $900,000, a large sum to attain in a lackluster economy within a tight time frame.Amidst the publicity on the plight of the building, a qualified buyer emerged who wanted to preserve and reuse the house as mixed-income housing with 30 percent allocated to affordable housing. Although promising, there was a serious gap between offer and asking price. The Norwalk Preservation Trust mobilized immediately and raised $27,000 in pledges in 48 hours. Paul Newman, a resident of next-door Westport, stepped in with a generous gift of $20,000, helping the cause with both his money and his name. Norwalk Mayor Alex Knopp aided the effort immensely by facilitating the use of $150,000 in affordable housing funds through the Norwalk Redevelopment Authority.State Senator Bob Genuario served as the attorney for the buyer, Andrew Kydes, and helped to produce a successful outcome. The stately mansion was built for George Ernst, an important collector of early American furniture. Constructed of brick on a granite base, the building was designed to provide a setting for Ernst's extraordinary collection of early American furniture and decorative objects. An impressive two-story portico with four Doric columns lends grandeur to the facade. A second-story balcony rests above an elaborate front door. Dentils trim the pediment, which contains a semi-elliptical window. The interior retains many interesting features including a mantel derived from the work of Christopher Wren and accurate Federal style moldings. Ernst was a pioneer in the appreciation of American decorative arts and amassed his collection before it became fashionable.Mr. Kydes is an experienced local contractor and is committed to preserving the building's historic character. The Norwalk Preservation Trust will have input on the rehabilitation plans. This public/private bipartisan effort saves not only an important building, but a historic neighborhood, as well.Loss of the Ernst House would have endangered two significant Queen Anne houses on adjacent properties.The row of three large houses built in the late nineteenth-century, starting with the Ernst House, is known locally as the "Three Sisters." Now these reminders of the grand architecture of a once wealthy and prestigious residential neighborhood are safe.

HPX Update: Elias Bradley House, New Haven

With an excellent location for its future home, this two story Greek Revival House will be shepherded to a new location by Neighborhood Housing Services of New Haven. The house was listed as an emergency alert on the Connecticut Trust web site in September of this year after publication of the last Exchange. At that time it was under immediate threat of demolition, because new development was planned for its site and adjacent property in the Westville section of New Haven. Site preparation was scheduled to begin right away. The owner agreed to allow the house to be moved to another property in order to save it from destruction.The move is planned for December 1. The Bradley House will then stand on a lot between two other historic houses in a very appropriate setting just below West Rock. At press time a contract is expected to be signed within the week. Neighborhood Housing Services will serve as the intermediate owner and has facilitated and organized the move. Elias Bradley built the house in 1835. It has pleasing proportions and a number of characteristic Greek Revival features. The gable end faces the street with a full triangular pediment. A one-story portico creates a focal point and shelters the entrance. Two fluted Doric columns rest on brick steps. The first- and second-story windows retain the original six-over-six sash, and a typical rectangular window appears in the pediment. Clapboard sheathes the exterior and the foundation is made of cut stone block. The building will retain its original use as a single family residence.

HPX Alert: Elias Bradley House, New Haven

This two story Greek Revival House is under immediate threat of demolition. New development is planned for the site in the Westville section of New Haven and site preparation will begin shortly. The owner has agreed to allow the house to be moved to another property in order to save it from destruction, but the time frame is very tight. The deadline is October 22, 2003.Elias Bradley was part owner of a nineteenth-century milling operation that was located nearby. He built this house in 1835. It has pleasing proportions and a number of characteristic Greek Revival features. The gable end faces the street with a full triangular pediment. A one-story portico creates a focal point and shelters the entrance. Two fluted Doric columns rest on brick steps. The first- and second-story windows retain the original six-over-six sash, while a typical rectangular window appears in the pediment. Clapboard sheathes the exterior and the foundation is made of cut stone block. Price: $1.00.Contact: Luda at Matthews Ventures 203-562-1000.

HPX Alert: 1740 Colonial, Westport

This beautiful c. 1740 Connecticut center chimney home is looking for new owners. Original huge center chimney with two fireplaces, wide pine floorboards, dogleg staircase, and timber frame construction with exposed beams is waiting for you! A beautiful house with original windows, woodwork, and many doors, and a fully finished second floor living space. This house also includes two additional c. 1929 wings which bring the square footage to almost 2800 square feet of living space.This house must be relocated soon, so interested parties be ready to move quickly. Preference will be given to State Historic Preservation Offices and museums; price negotiable for private use. Dismantling, labeling, shipping, documenting, and reconstruction services available.For more information, please visit http://homelesshomes.com/westport.htm or contact Vikki Papesh at Homeless Homes / Historic Preservation LLC via email at historicpreservation@wideopenwest.com or phone at (586) 615-7733.December 2003 Update: This house will be vacated in mid to late March and will be demolished by the end of April if a relocation contract is not secured. This house has not been contemporized and retains so much historic material that it is definitely worthy of preservation.