Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

Historic Properties Exchange

To list a property, to learn more about the properties listed, or to subscribe to Connecticut Preservation News contact Jane Montanaro,  at jmontanaro@cttrust.org or 203-562-6312.

Real Estate advertised is subject to the Federal Housing Act of 1968. Neither advertisers nor the Connecticut Trust are responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors contained in Historic Properties Exchange.

THE HISTORIC PROPERTIES EXCHANGE IS BEING REDESIGNED AND WILL BE UPDATED BY FALL OF 2017!

Roxbury Station, Roxbury

Commerical zoning and high property values are endangering a group of historic buildings on the scenic Shepaug River in the rural Town of Roxbury. As the only commerically-zoned area in the community, the complex, known as Roxbury Station, has attracte the interest of developers who want to tear down the buildings. However, reuse of the structures could result in an appealing retail complex that would fit into the picturesque surroundings along Route 67, a state-designated Scenic Road. The property is adjacent to a preserve containing the impressive stone remains of a nineteenth-century blast furnace.

Roxbury Station was a stop on the Shepaug Railroad, which was completed in 1872. Today the depot appears to be in good condition and retains quite a bit of authenticity. It has lost its platform, but original six-over-six windows remain, as well as loading doors and passenger doors. It has vertical-board siding. One end of the building was used for freight and the other end for passenger service.

Behind the depot, built into a rise in the land, stands a large, nineteenth-century warehouse. The building has two main floors and an attic. The parcel also includes a large, long lumber shed and a barn. The Shepaug River borders the property and flows over a low dam, creating a scenic waterfall.

The listing agent, Bonnie Bevans, has a love for her childhood hometown of Roxbury and hopes to find a buyer who will preserve the buildings.

Price: $1.9 million

Contact: Bonnie Bevans, William Raveis Real Estate, 860-488-3624.

Sperry House, New Haven

This two-and-a-half story house is located on a commercial area on a busy section of Whalley Avenue. Although the house is in fair condition, the location puts it in danger of being torn down and replaced with a commercial structure.

The house may date to the 1830s. It has a low-pitched roof with the gable facing the street. Some remodeling in the Italianate style was probably done later in the nineteenth century. The wondows are a mixture of six-over-one and six-over-six sashes, with simple, flat window surrounds. A pair of arched Italianate windows appear in the gable. The triple window on the first floor facade is a twentieth-century alteration, as is the entryway. A historical photo shows an Italianate front porch with decorative brackets.

Gay Sperry, a bookkeeper with the New Have Bank, built the house. He bought the land from the Osborn family, whose homestead was located nearby in the early nineteenth century.

The house needs updating. It contains twelve rooms, which could become attractive offices. At present, it is configured as a two-famioy residence.

Lot size: .6

Price: $399,000

Contact: Teresa Sirico 203-469-5330

Toll House, Franklin

Known locally as the 1801 Toll House, this interesting building originally sat very close to the road linking Norwich and Willimantic, now Route 32.  It operated as a toll house in the nineteenth century.  The road bed was later moved about twenty-five feet away.The exterior is covered in clapboard, and the building retains early interior doors and some wide-board floors.  It is constructed of hand-hewn timbers, some of which display Roman numerals cut into the wood near the mortise and tenon joints.  These marks are characteristic of timber frame construction and showed which timbers were to be joined together.  This assembly method used Roman numerals so that the marks could be made with a straight tool.The current owner acquired the property in 1980.  He has not be able to maintain it for financial reasons and is looking for someone to move the building off his property, who would restore it on another site.  All costs would be the responsibility of the mover. Contact: Gary Young, 860-642-7559.

Toll House, Franklin

Known locally as the 1801 Toll House, this interesting building originally sat very close to the road linking Norwich and Willimantic, now Route 32.  It operated as a toll house in the nineteenth century.  The road bed was later moved about twenty-five feet away.The exterior is covered in clapboard, and the building retains early interior doors and some wide-board floors.  It is constructed of hand-hewn timbers, some of which display Roman numerals cut into the wood near the mortise and tenon joints.  These marks are characteristic of timber frame construction and showed which timbers were to be joined together.  This assembly method used Roman numerals so that the marks could be made with a straight tool.The current owner acquired the property in 1980.  He has not be able to maintain it for financial reasons and is looking for someone to move the building off his property, who would restore it on another site.  All costs would be the responsibility of the mover. Contact: Gary Young, 860-642-7559.

Lockwood Outbuilding, Norwalk

This nineteenth-century outbuilding was part of the Deacon Charles Lockwood homestead in the old Borough of Norwalk.  It needs to be moved to another site due to a development plan that will save and rehabilitate a row of three historic houses located at the front of the property.  Two of the houses are associated with the Lockwood family, one of Norwalk’s founding families.At present, the outbuilding contains two apartments.  Its former use is not known with certainty.  Built into the side of a bank, the one-and-a-half story structure may have served as a stable or as servants’ quarters or a combination of both.  The basement level has a small fireplace with iron fittings for cooking, which indicates that at least part of the building has a residential use historically.The building is approximately 40 feet long and was probably constructed in two stages, with the section to the right being earlier.  It is sheathed in clapboard and is of post and beam construction with house, an in-law apartment, a barn or a garage.  While the owner would like to see the building saved, due to practical considerations, quick responses would be greatly appreciated.  Price: $1, Contact: Bill Kraus, 203-899-0480.

Mason Hamilton Post House, Essex

This vernacular farmhouse, built around 1830, will face demolition unless it is moved to another location.  The original portion of the two-story house is a twenty by twenty-five foot block with the gable end facing the street.  A one-story lean-to stands at the rear.  Two later additions were built sometime before 1929.  A front porch adds neighborhood quality.The house is associated with families of local prominence.  When Mason Hamilton Post, the first owner, wed Rebecca Hayden in 1829, he married into a family with extensive land holdings.  This allowed him to become the prime developer of Maple Avenue.  Three generations of the Doane family occupied the house for most of the twentieth century.  Charles Doane, Jr., was the Essex Postmaster and a selectman.The building is reported to have dry rot and termite damage.  These conditions can often be remedied.  The house needs to be moved on a tight deadline.  Contact: Charles Doane III, 860-767-1562.

Lockwood Outbuilding, Norwalk

This nineteenth-century outbuilding was part of the Deacon Charles Lockwood homestead in the old Borough of Norwalk.  It needs to be moved to another site due to a development plan that will save and rehabilitate a row of three historic houses located at the front of the property.  Two of the houses are associated with the Lockwood family, one of Norwalk’s founding families.At present, the outbuilding contains two apartments.  Its former use is not known with certainty.  Built into the side of a bank, the one-and-a-half story structure may have served as a stable or as servants’ quarters or a combination of both.  The basement level has a small fireplace with iron fittings for cooking, which indicates that at least part of the building has a residential use historically.The building is approximately 40 feet long and was probably constructed in two stages, with the section to the right being earlier.  It is sheathed in clapboard and is of post and beam construction with house, an in-law apartment, a barn or a garage.  While the owner would like to see the building saved, due to practical considerations, quick responses would be greatly appreciated.  Price: $1, Contact: Bill Kraus, 203-899-0480.

Margaret Hoyt Smith House, Rowayton

Built around 1875, this large, gracious house later became the home of Margaret Hoyt Smith, a prominent Norwalk architect.  She remodeled the interior in the 1950s into a very livable space reflecting Colonial Revival taste, while retaining original woodwork and other details.  The result is sympathetic mixture of styles from two different centuries.The house is located on a bluff with magnificent views of Long Island Sound.  On a clear day Long Island itself is visible.  This extraordinary site has endangered the house.  The property is slated to be developed with several new houses.  Despite the fact that the Hoyt House is in good condition, it is not part of the new plan.  The developer is offering the house for $1 if moved to another location.  It was relocated once before, when John Farrell, president of U.S.Steel, had it moved about 300 feet and turned it to face the water.  He decided to build a new house on the original site of the Hoyt House.The Hoyt House has a square tower and a one-story, wrap-around porch with turned supports.  Bands of fish-scale shingles enliven the surface of the tower.  The rest of the building is covered in clapboard.  The house has three stories of living space, including an exceptional bedroom at the top of the tower.  Contact: Ned Brooks, 203-972-1899 or nedbrooks@optonline.net.

Rhodes House, Fairfield

This two-story, wood-frame house was built in 1809 and displays a simple New England dignity. Cedar shingles covered in gray paint clad the exterior. The first-floor windows have six-over-six sashes, while the smaller windows upstairs have nine-over-six sashes. The building rests on a fieldstone foundation.

Located on a corner parcel in the Greenfield Hill section of Fairfield, the Rhodes house is one of few surviving examples of its type in Fairfield. The original portion of the house contains the front door and the two windows to the right on both stories. The two-story section to the left of the entrance is an early addition, as is the one-story section beyond it. The wrought-iron railings at the entrance and the aluminum awning are obvious modern attachments and could be easily removed. This would leave an authentic early-nineteenth-century dwelling.

One family has owned this house for almost 100 years. It has four fireplaces and retains early interior features, such as wide-board floors. Nothing is known about the original owner, James Rhodes, except that he owned land in Fairfield in the early nineteenth century and built this house. Stone walls line the road frontage of the two-acre property, which contains mature trees and shrubs and a picturesque pond. A barn, an outhouse, and a stone well add to the classic New England atmosphere. The barn has badly weathered vertical-board siding, but is protected from the elements by tar paper. Beside it a stone foundation remains from another barn, now removed.

The house needs rehabilitation. It contains approximately 1,800 square feet of floor space. Fortunately, it is not being marketed as a teardown. However, the risk of such a fate is great in southern Fairfield County, where historic houses are too often demolished when located on desirable property. Contact: Doris Rowe, Coldwell Banker Real Estate, 203-227-1269. Price: $795,000.