Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

Historic Properties Exchange

To list a property, to learn more about the properties listed, or to subscribe to Connecticut Preservation News contact Jane Montanaro,  at jmontanaro@cttrust.org or 203-562-6312.

Real Estate advertised is subject to the Federal Housing Act of 1968. Neither advertisers nor the Connecticut Trust are responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors contained in Historic Properties Exchange.

THE HISTORIC PROPERTIES EXCHANGE IS BEING REDESIGNED AND WILL BE UPDATED BY FALL OF 2017!

Wyllys Russell House and Barn, Branford

Built in 1820, this two-story house retains a high degree of authenticity. It is located in an area known since colonial times as Canoe Brook. Today the neighborhood is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as the Canoe Brook Historic District. The owners of the Russell House are offering the building free of charge to anyone who will use a properly licensed contractor to remove the building from the property for restoration elsewhere. Seventeen condominium units are proposed for the site. The house is of post and beam construction and wood shingles sheath the exterior. A one-story portico forms the focal point of the symmetrical facade, which has two windows on either side of the entry on the first floor and five windows across the second story. Two columns support a shallow hipped roof over the front door. The door is paneled with a four-light transom above. It is flanked by pilasters. The windows were converted to two-over-two sash later in the nineteenth century. The brick center chimney serves three fireplaces. The interior remains largely intact, primarily due to the fact that only two families have occupied the house since its construction. Wyllys and Laura Russell built the house on land that had been conveyed to them by Laura’s mother in 1816. Wyllys Russell lived there for at least fifty years. Frederick S. Jordon bought the house in 1875, and his daughter, Caroline, occupied it until her death in 1989. At present, the building is owned by Caroline Jordon’s heirs. In addition to the house, the property contains a nineteenth-century barn that needs to be relocated. The barn has a hayloft. The barn’s dimensions are approximately 29 feet by 25 feet. The house contains approximately 2,100 square feet of floor space. Contact: Joe FitzGerald, RE/MAX Alliance, 203-781-8858.

Rockwell School, New Britain

The City of New Britain is offering this nineteenth-century brick building located on Franklin Square for sale. Built around 1867 as a school, it was named for Reverend Samuel Rockwell, who served as the first minister of the South Congregational Church and represented the city in the Connecticut General Assembly. In the 1940s, Central Connecticut State College (then the Teachers College of Connecticut) leased the building for its Departments of English and Social Sciences after several years of disuse. It subsequently served as a courthouse, and as such was a prominent civic building anchoring the corner of Franklin Square. Now Rockwell School has been vacant since 1998.The building is constructed of brick with brownstone trim, which was quarried in nearby Portland. An 1892 photograph shows a square Italianate entry porch and a square central bell tower on the roof. The entrance was changed when the building served as a courthouse, and the tower has been removed. The porch now has a flat roof supported by three Tuscan columns at each corner. Drawings of the bell tower exist, making its future restoration a possibility. Arched windows appear on the second story in pairs, and decorative brackets support the roof. Coffered ceilings enhance the interior.Franklin Square is a triangular park that has recently undergone restoration and contains trees, statuary, and benches. A well-known statue of the Goddess of Peace stands at the park’s southern end, across from Rockwell School. The square is surrounded by churches and former civic buildings now converted for a variety of uses. The area is on the edge of New Britain’s downtown and blends into a residential district of large nineteenth-century houses. The Rockwell School building contains almost 24,000 square feet of floor space and a full-size elevator. It is zoned for office/professional use and would be best suited to become a corporate headquarters or a multi-tenant office building. The asking price is negotiable and will be based on future use. Prospective buyers will need to demonstrate the financial ability to complete the restoration of the building. Contact: Downtown District Director Don Courtemanche at 860-229-1665, extension 15.Information is also available at http://www.newbritaindd.com.

Rockwell School, New Britain

The City of New Britain is offering this nineteenth century brick building located on Franklin Square for sale. Built around 1867 as a school, it was named for Reverend Samuel Rockwell, who served as the first minister of the South Congregational Church and represented the city in the Connecticut General Assembly. In the 1940s, Central Connecticut State College (then the Teachers College of Connecticut) leased the building for its Departments of English and Social Sciences after several years of disuse. It subsequently served as a court house, and as such was a prominent civic building anchoring the corner of Franklin Square. Now Rockwell School has been vacant since 1998.The building is constructed of brick with brownstone trim, which was quarried in nearby Portland. An 1892 photograph shows a square Italianate entry porch and a square central bell tower on the roof. The entrance was changed when the building served as a courthouse, and the tower has been removed. The porch now has a flat roof supported by three Tuscan columns at each corner. Drawings of the bell tower exist, making its future restoration a possibility. Arched windows appear on the second story in pairs, and decorative brackets support the roof. Coffered ceilings enhance the interior.Franklin Square is a triangular park that has recently undergone restoration and contains trees, statuary, and benches. A well-known statue of the Goddess of Peace stands at the park’s southern end, across from Rockwell School. The square is surrounded by churches and former civic buildings now converted for a variety of uses. The area is on the edge of New Britain’s downtown and blends into a residential district of large nineteenth-century houses. The Rockwell School building contains almost 24,000 square feet of floor space and a full-size elevator. It is zoned for office/professional use and would be best suited to become a corporate headquarters or a multi-tenant office building. The asking price is negotiable and will be based on future use. Prospective buyers will need to demonstrate the financial ability to complete the restoration of the building. Contact: Downtown District Director Don Courtemanche at 860-229-1665, extension 15.Information is also available at http://www.newbritaindd.com.

414 High Street, Willimantic

This two-story house stands at the north entrance to Eastern Connecticut State University. The university plans to build a campus police station on the site and is looking for a person or organization that would move the building and restore it elsewhere. Officials feel that the residential nature of the structure makes it difficult to use it for the university’s needs. Records indicate that the land for the present site was sold to a farmer, Borintha Crowell, in 1842, but the house is likely to have a later date. The gable end of the house faces the street, and decorative trusses appear at the peaks of the gables. The second-story window crowns are incised with a scroll design. The interior of the house features generous sized rooms with abundant natural light. The first floor has an asymmetrical plan with two large rooms off of the main entry, one of which features a bay window. The main entry hall still has the original staircase with mahogany balusters and railing, as well as a front door with a segmented arch above. The windows are large, with two-over two sash. The university is willing to give the house to the right individual or organization. For further information call Nancy Tinker, Director of Facilities Management and Planning, at 860-465-5348.

Hubbard Farm, Middletown

This evocative farm, which was established by one of Middletown’s founding families, is threatened by a subdivision proposal. An eighteenth-century house rests on a small hill surrounded by lilacs and mature maple trees. An eighteenth-century barn, other outbuildings, and a fenced-in paddock create a traditional barnyard. The Hubbards called the farm “Green Hill.” Due to the historical importance of Hubbard Farm and its high degree of authenticity, the Middletown Planning and Zoning Commission imposed a one-year moratorium on developing the one-acre parcel that contains the principal buildings and the paddock. The commission wanted to allow time for a buyer to emerge who would retain the buildings, paddock, and farm-like character of the property. The existing eighteenth-century house incorporates parts of an earlier watch house, built in 1675, when Middletown colonists needed protection. In a most unusual combination, much of the first floor retains the seventeenth-century brownstone exterior of the watch house, while the rest of the house is sheathed in clapboard. The house was built with a center chimney and a second-story overhang on the front and side. The east side retains a gable overhang as well. A double-attic roof-framing system, which is an unusual structural feature, remains above the second story. Although the actual floorboards to the second attic have been removed, all the early structural members remain. A two-story bay window was added around 1868. The interior retains many historic features including wide-board floors, paneled fireplace walls, and wainscoting.For further information on purchasing the property contact Dennis Amato at 203-671-9234. For further information on the history of Hubbard Farm go to http://hubbardfarm.freehomepage.com or call Carolyn Laban at 860-344-8926. Price: $440,000.

Deming House, Litchfield

This house, built in 1884, stands in a landlocked position behind a nursing home in the Litchfield Historic District. The district is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The house originally fronted North Street, but was moved back in the 1960s, when the bank next door acquired the site for parking. Apple Health Care now owns both the Deming House and the skilled nursing facility, Rose Haven. The company plans to build an addition to the nursing home and would like to find someone to remove the Deming House from the property and restore it at another location. Although aluminum siding hides the window surrounds and other architectural details, the Deming House retains its graceful form and asymmetrical massing. The aluminum siding covers the first and second stories, but dormers at the attic level are still sheathed in board and batten siding. Originally, the dormers were also accented with Stick-style decorative trusses. At present, the interior contains three rental units. Apple Health Care will allow approximately six months for removal of the Deming House from the Rose Haven property.Price: $1. Contact: Jamick Szefer, 860-678-9755.

414 High Street, Willimantic

This two-story house stands at the north entrance to Eastern Connecticut State University. The university plans to build a campus police station on the site and is looking for a person or organization that would move the building and restore it elsewhere. Officials feel that the residential nature of the structure makes it difficult to use it for the university’s needs. Records indicate that the land for the present site was sold to a farmer, Borintha Crowell, in 1842, but the house is likely to have a later date. The gable end of the house faces the street, and decorative trusses appear at the peaks of the gables. The second-story window crowns are incised with a scroll design. The interior of the house features generous sized rooms with abundant natural light. The first floor has an asymmetrical plan with two large rooms off of the main entry, one of which features a bay window. The main entry hall still has the original staircase with mahogany balusters and railing, as well as a front door with a segmented arch above. The windows are large, with two-over-two sash. The university is willing to give the house to the right individual or organization.For further information call Nancy Tinker, Director of Facilities Management and Planning, at 860-465-5348.

HPX Alert: Baker-Sabo House, Ashford

The Town of Ashford is accepting bids to remove the 18th century, two story colonial farmhouse known as the Baker-Sabo House, or Baker House on 25 Pompey Hollow Road, Ashford. The Building Committee is hoping that someone will come forward to move or carefully disassemble and then reassemble the structure. The State Register house is located adjacent to the Knowlton Town Hall, a National Register building, in the downtown historic area. The c. 1814 colonial has an attic and is of post and bean construction. Notable features of the building include original curled leaf door latches and mantle chimney cupboards above and flanking a fireplace mantle. The house’s most ornate mantelpiece shows simple molded architrave trim around the fireplace opening, with a plain paneled frieze above, surmounted by a few plain moldings and a shelf.  Bids must be received on or before 3:00 PM August 12, 2003. Please contact the Town Clerk’s office at Knowlton Hall, 860-429-7044.