Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

James K. Grant Associates

30 Depot Street
P.O. Box 236
Collinsville, Connecticut 06022
Phone: 860-693-8403
Fax: 860-693-8512
Email:
Contact: James K. Grant, P.E.

2010 Lifetime Achievement Award - Hartford Preservation Alliance

James K. Grant Associates was established in 1985 and has been active in historic preservation projects since its founding.  Located in the historic Collins Company Ax Factory on the Farmington River, we have enjoyed playing an active role in preservation of many of Connecticut’s unique treasures.  From barns to landmarks, we value the past and are committed to maintaining the integrity of these structures for the use and pleasure of future generations.

We have been very active in the Historic Barns Grant program of the Connecticut Trust, having completed structural assessments of 11 barns under that program.  We have participated in studies and renovation of many other barns as well.

Connecticut’s 19th and early 20th century mill buildings are very important structures in the state’s industrial past.   Fortunately, many of them are being recycled and given a new life and a new purpose.  The adaptive reuse of the Cheney Mill Dye House in Manchester is due to be completed in Spring 2011 and will contain 57 residential units.  One of American Thread Company’s large granite mill buildings in Willimantic has been converted to an Artspace building with residential/studio units and art exhibit space.

Under an agreement with CT Trust, the firm is currently designing stabilization measures for the 1885 Northwest School, Hartford’s oldest surviving school building and recently named to the National Register of Historic Places.  It will become the home of the John E. Rogers African American Cultural Center.

The diversity of our historic preservation experience can be seen in this sampling of projects: Colt Factory dome restoration, the famous blue onion atop Colt’s east armory; Kent Iron Furnace at the Sloane-Stanley Museum in Kent, stabilization of an important structure from Connecticut’s iron industry; and at the Betty Ruth and Milton B. Hollander Foundation Center, Hartford for the adaptive reuse of a 1926 office building for 70 mixed-income residential apartments.  (LEED certified Gold, the first such building in CT.)