Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

HPX Update: Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding

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Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding, Saved from Demolition.

This vernacular historic house and its two barns were saved from destruction through the advocacy efforts of the Redding Preservation Society, along with the perseverance of town historian Charles Couch and the support of the Redding Historical Society. The buildings were located on a modest farm that had been tended by the Qualey family in the nineteenth century. Patrick and Kathryn Qualey emigrated from Ireland and settled in Redding in the 1870s. Members of the family occupied the house into the 1940s. The land is now owned by the Redding Country Club. At the urging of the Preservation Society and Mr. Couch, the Country Club agreed to allow the buildings to be removed from the property for reassembly elsewhere, as an alternative to demolition. The house and barns were listed in the July/August 2003 issue of the Exchange. 

 The buildings have been disassembled and the parts numbered and stored for reconstruction on another tract of land within the Town of Redding. The three buildings will remain together, thereby retaining their historical association with one another, although their uses may be reversed. The house may be used for storage and one of the barns adapted as living quarters.

During disassembly, physical evidence revealed that the house was older than first thought and, in fact, dated from the mid-eighteenth century. It appears that the building was originally a one-and-a-half story, center-chimney, Cape Cod style house. The roof was raised and a full second story and attic were added around 1870, when the Qualey family took possession. Mr. Couch coordinated the many facets of the project, and the Redding Country Club contributed to the cost of disassembly and moving.

HPX Update: Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding

back to listings

Patrick Qualey House and Barns, Redding, Saved from Demolition.

This vernacular historic house and its two barns were saved from destruction through the advocacy efforts of the Redding Preservation Society, along with the perseverance of town historian Charles Couch and the support of the Redding Historical Society. The buildings were located on a modest farm that had been tended by the Qualey family in the nineteenth century. Patrick and Kathryn Qualey emigrated from Ireland and settled in Redding in the 1870s. Members of the family occupied the house into the 1940s. The land is now owned by the Redding Country Club. At the urging of the Preservation Society and Mr. Couch, the Country Club agreed to allow the buildings to be removed from the property for reassembly elsewhere, as an alternative to demolition. The house and barns were listed in the July/August 2003 issue of the Exchange. 

 The buildings have been disassembled and the parts numbered and stored for reconstruction on another tract of land within the Town of Redding. The three buildings will remain together, thereby retaining their historical association with one another, although their uses may be reversed. The house may be used for storage and one of the barns adapted as living quarters.

During disassembly, physical evidence revealed that the house was older than first thought and, in fact, dated from the mid-eighteenth century. It appears that the building was originally a one-and-a-half story, center-chimney, Cape Cod style house. The roof was raised and a full second story and attic were added around 1870, when the Qualey family took possession. Mr. Couch coordinated the many facets of the project, and the Redding Country Club contributed to the cost of disassembly and moving.