Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

Historic Properties Exchange

Historic Properties Exchange is published to advertise endangered historic properties in Connecticut by the Connecticut Trust, a statewide nonprofit organization located at 940 Whitney Avenue, Hamden, CT 06517.  Real Estate advertised is subject to the Federal Housing Act of 1968. Neither advertisers nor the Connecticut Trust are responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors contained in Historic Properties Exchange.

To list a property, to learn more about the properties listed, or to subscribe to Connecticut Preservation News contact Jane Montanaro, Preservation Services Officer at jmontanaro@cttrust.org or 203-562-6312.

Tarlpin House, Farmington

This rambling farmhouse, built on the west side of the Farmington Canal right of way, dates to about 1830. It was built by Asahel Peck, who was first listed as a farmer in the Scott Swamp District of Farmington in the 1830 census. The farm remained in the Peck family through most of the nineteenth century. The state acquired the property sometime before 1928 from the Tarplin family

The house is of post and beam construction and was built in three sections over time. It is an example of a simple farmhouse that grew and evolved during the mid-nineteenth century. Starting as a small, center-chimney, one-and-a-half story dwelling, it was enlarged and remodeled several times. The house survives as an unpretentious working farmhouse. It looks much as it did at the turn of the century.

A recessed, one-and-a-half-story kitchen was added, and then a one-story milk room. Each section of the house has a gable roof. Six-over-six window sashes were uses throughout, but were replaced by two-over-two sashes in much of the original section.

The interior features a Greek Revival fireplace surround and paneled doors. The kitchen wing has wainscoting. The first floor contains seven rooms, including a bathroom and kitchen. The second floor contains six rooms. The house has an attic and basement. The floor space adds up to a total of 2,670 square feet.

The house is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the structure from the site, reconstruct it on their own lot, and leave the former site cleared and clean. For an application, please contact Wanda Torres, States Parks Division, at 860-418-5963 or wanda.torres@po.state.ct.us. The deadline is June 30, 2006.

Roxbury Station, Roxbury

This 3.93 acre complex located at 6 Mine Hill Road has four buildings on it, including: a circa 1830 Railroad Depot, a circa 1830 Tobacco Processing Barn, a large wood shed (24 x 100), a a three bay Garage.

The site is bordered by the Roxbury Land Trust and the Shepaug River, including a waterfall (which is a part of the property).  The station has been closed since 1948. 

This is a great opportunity to incorporate a historically significant site with a viable commercial venture.

Contact: Bonnie Bevans 860-927-1819 office, bee@bbevansrealestate.com.  Listed at $1,500,000. 

 

 

HPX -  November/December 2008 - Masonic Hall, 245 Main Street, Wethersfield

Located on the corner of Church and Mainstreets in Old Wethersfield, this former Masonic hall from the 1920s offers agreat opportunity for re-use. Although the interior is gutted and ready for building,the exterior is in very good condition and retains the many of the originaldetails that represented freemasons and defined Masonic halls.

Contact: SharonCarducci, William Raveis Real Estate, 860-563-2881 or carduccis@Raveisre.com

Thomas Hawley House, Monroe

The “little red saltbox on Purdy Hill Road” is set on 1.3 acres and was built c1755 as the centerpiece of a large working farm. It boasts an efficient kitchen, 2 cooking fireplaces, two or three bedrooms, original paneling, cedar closets, and a separate barn and workshop, plus a large two car garage. Even though the site is presently zoned for residential use only, the fear is that if the building falls into the wrong hands, a future zoning change could threaten the house.

Contact: Tom Nissley, Prudential Realty, 203-322-1400 tnissley@prudentialct.com

Listed: $649,000.00

HPX -  November/December 2008 - Comstock Ferre Complex, 243-263 Main Street, Wethersfield

Comstock Ferre is possibly the oldest continuously operatingseed company in the nation. In addition to its main building, fronting on Wethersfield's Main Street, theproperty includes a large barn, the oldest section of which was probably builtsometime between the 1840s and the 1880s. The property is located in theWethersfield National Register district and the Wethersfield local historic district. Thebarns on the property recently faced demolition, but the local historicdistrict commission changed their initial ruling to deny the razing and savethe barns.

Contact: JamesNeckermann @ 860-883-6312 or neckermannj@aol.com

HPX -  November/December 2008 - Elias Sprague House, Coventry

Built in 1821 and listed on the National Register ofHistoric Places, this one and a half story, four-room cape is situated on fourheavily wooded acres between moderate residential construction and the Nathan Hale State Forestin Coventry, Connecticut. The interior is almost entirelyoriginal, following the traditional floor plan of two front rooms on eitherside of a small hall with kitchen at the rear, a large central chimney andfieldstone foundation. The Sprague lot will have some deed restrictions—thebuyer will have to preserve the historic facade of the building and cannotsubdivide the property to put up other houses. The current owner, the CoventryHistorical Society, is selling the historic home in the hope that the proceedswill help maintain its other antique buildings and museums.

Contact: LandmarksAntique & Country Properties at (860) 423-7484

 

                                                                                 Photo credit: Hugh Smith

59 Crescent Street, Middletown

This Victorian house, built around 1880, will face demolition unless it is moved to another location.  It must be relocated to allow expansion of the hospital.  It is currently used to house hospital programs.The building’s interior is in need of renovation.  The house needs to be moved on a tight deadline, and Middlesex Hospital is willing to contribute to the cost of relocation.  Contact Randy Cole at Stratton Brook Associates, 860-651-6751.

Heritage House, Redding

Built around 1795, this two-story house is located to the west of Redding Green in the Redding Center Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Standing on a small rise, Heritage House faces another eighteenth-century dwelling across the street with protected rolling fields stretching to the horizon behind it. Heritage House abuts a historic cemetery on one side and the police station to the rear. A twenty-foot buffer separates the lot from municipal property and is protected with a conservation easement.

The house rests on a stone foundation and has a wood shingle exterior, painted white. A one-story, entry porch with a gable roof forms the focal point of the symmetrical facade. Thin columns support the arched entryway. The windows have six-over-six sashes with simple surrounds.

 Some alteration took place in the mid-nineteenth century. An Italianate-style bay window projects from the west side of the house, and a two-story addition with a flat roof stands to the rear. A historic barn with board and batten siding is located behind the house.

 Used for many years as a senior center, the Town of Redding is now offering Heritage House for sale in a sealed bid process. Bid packages are available from the First Selectman's office. A structural engineer has conducted an analysis of the building, which was funded by a grant from the Connecticut Trust. His report is part of the bid package. The house must be used as a single-family residence. It is structurally sound, but needs updating and repairs recommended by the engineer.

The house is being sold with preservation easements, which will protect its historic integrity. The town will hold an open house for potential buyers on Friday, September 8, 2006. The engineer will be available to answer questions. Contact: Ms. Anita Arnold, Office of the First Selectman, 203-938-2002. Minimum bid: $430,000.

Tarplin House, Farmington

This rambling farmhouse, built on the west side of the Farmington Canal right of way, dates to about 1830. It was built by Asahel Peck, who was first listed as a farmer in the Scott Swamp District of Farmington in the 1830 census. The farm remained in the Peck family through most of the nineteenth century. The state acquired the property sometime before 1928 from the Tarplin family

The house is of post and beam construction and was built in three sections over time. It is an example of a simple farmhouse that grew and evolved during the mid-nineteenth century. Starting as a small, center-chimney, one-and-a-half story dwelling, it was enlarged and remodeled several times. The house survives as an unpretentious working farmhouse. It looks much as it did at the turn of the century.

A recessed, one-and-a-half-story kitchen was added, and then a one-story milk room. Each section of the house has a gable roof. Six-over-six window sashes were uses throughout, but were replaced by two-over-two sashes in much of the original section.

The interior features a Greek Revival fireplace surround and paneled doors. The kitchen wing has wainscoting. The first floor contains seven rooms, including a bathroom and kitchen. The second floor contains six rooms. The house has an attic and basement. The floor space adds up to a total of 2,670 square feet.

The house is offered for $1.00, if removed from the property. Potential buyers must demonstrate the ability to remove the structure from the site, reconstruct it on their own lot, and leave the former site cleared and clean. For an application, please contact Wanda Torres, States Parks Division, at 860-418-5963 or wanda.torres@po.state.ct.us.