Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation

Historic Properties Exchange

Historic Properties Exchange is published to advertise endangered historic properties in Connecticut by the Connecticut Trust, a statewide nonprofit organization located at 940 Whitney Avenue, Hamden, CT 06517.  Real Estate advertised is subject to the Federal Housing Act of 1968. Neither advertisers nor the Connecticut Trust are responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors contained in Historic Properties Exchange.

To list a property, to learn more about the properties listed, or to subscribe to Connecticut Preservation News contact Jane Montanaro, Preservation Services Officer at jmontanaro@cttrust.org or 203-562-6312.

HPX: January - February 2014

Doody’s Farm (1698)

394 Foxon Road

North Branford

Located on Route 80 in North Branford, this historic farmstead is being marketed as a potential development site. Possibly the oldest house in North Branford, the site contains a 3 bedroom farmhouse and four outbuildings. The outbuildings have been photographed and included in the Connecticut Trust’s Historic Barns of Connecticut database (www.connecticutbarns.org). The property would likely qualify for listing on the Connecticut State Register of Historic Places. According to www.realtor.com, this is the first time the property has been made available for sale.

Contact: Dow Realty Company, 945 Grand Avenue, New Haven; (203) 776-0000 or email info@dowrealty.com.

Mill Building (1901)

501 Middle Turnpike East

Manchester

This building was historically known as the Glastonbury Knitting Mills when the mill produced men’s long woolen underwear at the beginning of the 20th century. By the 1920s, the garment had lost popularity leading to the close of the mill. The building has since seen service as an antique store, drug store, bar, printing plant, furniture store, shoe store, warehouse, bookshop, and is now available for redevelopment. Features include a great location on the Manchester Green with easy access to Main Street, Rt. 84 and Rt. 384; also brick masonry construction, tower with mansard roof, more than 30,000 square feet of space, high ceilings, wood flooring, and more. Rehabilitation may qualify for historic preservation tax credits.

Contact: Barry Cyr (860) 645-1776, office@condorealty.com

Barn (c. 1880)

Putnam

Large gentleman’s stable is available for relocation. Still standing, the barn measures 30’ x 40’ (plus cupola) and a 25’ x 30’ addition. Intact are the original horse stalls, flooring, decorative woodwork, tack closets with hardware, and wall sheathing. All woodwork has original, untouched painted surfaces.

Contact: William Gould Architectural Preservation, LLC at 860-974-3448 or visit the website http://historic-architecture.com/historicbarns.html.

Deadline for submissions to the March-April 2014 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is February 21, 2014.

HPX: November-December 2013

Sanford-Bristol House (1790)

Milford

On November 6, the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and the Milford Preservation Trust reached a settlement with the owners of the Sanford- Bristol house to prevent the house’s demolition. The settlement came as a result of a lawsuit filed under the Connecticut Environmental Protection Act.

The settlement gives the two Trusts until mid-January to find a new buyer who will complete the renovation of the house. After that, the Farrells may proceed with the demolition as approved. The asking price is $200,000 -- cash only.
 

Built in 1790, the Sanford- Bristol house is a contributing resource in the River Park National Register district. With its uncommon outline -- a gambrel roof in front and a lean-to in back -- it belongs to a small but distinctive group in Milford, likely the work of a single builder, or a reflection of local tastes. Renovation has been started but not completed; structural investigation indicates that the building is basically sound.

Contact: Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation if you are interested in viewing the home. Email: Milford@cttrust.org Phone: 203.562.6312

Naugatuck Train Station (1910)

195 Water Street

Naugatuck

A contributing resource to the Naugatuck Center National Register Historic District and owned by the Borough of Naugatuck, this Spanish Colonial Revival-style train station is available for redevelopment.  The station was designed by Henry Bacon (1866-1924), a major American architect.  Located on a still active rail line, the site offers great redevelopment potential.  Grants and federal and state historic preservation tax credits may apply.

Link to the National Register nomination: http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NRHP/Text/99000859.pdf.

Contact: Naugatuck Economic Development Corporation at (203) 723-4411 or info@naugatuckedc.com.

Dreshner’s Restaurant (1903)

25 Leavenworth Street

Waterbury

Historic restaurant is available for purchase or lease.  Drescher's Restaurant, the city's oldest restaurant, closed nearly a year ago. Drescher's opened in 1868 and moved into its Leavenworth Street building in 1904.  The mahogany and oak bar was one a city landmark. For more information, see article published in the American-Republican (http://www.rep-am.com/articles/2013/09/16/news/local/750536.txt). The building is a contributing structure in the Downtown Waterbury National Register district and may be eligible for grants and federal and state historic preservation tax credits.

Contact: Drubner Commercial Real Estate in Waterbury at (203) 753-4116 or visit www.drubner.com.

Residence (1897)

194-198 Black Rock Avenue

Bridgeport

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Division Street Historic District, this multi-family residence is located in a good neighborhood about four blocks from the beach (Seaside Park).  The house is currently vacant and in foreclosure.  Investment in this property may qualify for the state Historic Homes Tax Credit program. (Link: http://www.cultureandtourism.org/cct/cwp/view.asp?a=3933&q=302270)

Contact: Carrington Real Estate Services, Joe Gruttadauria at (203) 732-8788.

Residence (1953)

3 Dogwood Lane

Darien

In danger of becomimg a teardown: this residence designed by Edward Durell Stone, friend of Frank Lloyd Wright, is currently for sale. Like Wright, Stone was inspired by Japanese architecture; the house’s warm wooden interior, shoji screens, and harmony with the landscape all reflect this influence.

Contact: Mary Lopiano at (203) 656-6566 or mlopiano@halstead.com.

Deadline for submissions to the January-February 2014 issue of Historic Properties Exchange is December 20, 2013.

September-October 2013

Kingsley-Havermeyer House

31 Whitney Avenue
New Haven

The historic Kingsley-Havermeyer House, a New Haven Landmark building, is up for sale.
Built in the 1850's the building boasts over 5,000 square feet of office space on three floors and a private 12-car parking lot.  The basement office has a separate, private entrance at the back of the building.  The building sits in the heart of the legal and office district on the edge of the Yale campus.
The building's third floor has a spacious two bedroom apartment, with a living room and a large eat-in kitchen.

Building is listed for $849,900. 
Contact: Steven Press at Press/Cuozzo Realtors  (203) 407-4698

Mansion House

Northeastern Connecticut

Mansion House was a term used in early land records when referring to a two-story dwelling.  This rare survivor, built by a very wealthy individual is a first period Connecticut two over two that epitomized the Mansion House, measuring 20’4” in depth x 46’10” in length.  The original portion is framed in oak, chestnut and pine, the longer timbers are hewn and the shorter timbers are mechanically sawn.  All the girts, plates and summers are beaded. There is 8’ feet clearance on both floors between the underside of the summers and the flooring.   The posts, straight on the first floor and shouldered on the second are chamfered with wind braces of at least 7’ feet long at every corner.  The first floor walls were originally filled with nogging.  The layout is asymmetric with the parlor and parlor chamber measuring 19’5” x 19’8” and the hall and hall chamber measuring 17’3” x 19’5” while the porch is 9’6” in width. The first period front stairway, dogleg to the left, retains its handrail and newel posts with a drop finial.  Original flooring exists on the second floor and in the attic.  Some four-panel doors 36” in width have survived along with a first period curved back corner cupboard.

The house was enlarged in circa 1830 by adding 12’ onto the rear making the new depth 32’4”.  In the process, a post and purlin frame was installed in the attic to support the reuse of the original rafters on the front side, in two pieces, and new one-piece rafters on the rear.  The original stone chimney was removed at the time of expansion and replaced with five brick fireplaces and a brick chimney through the roof.

The building is to be dismantled.

Contact: William Gould, William Gould Architectural Preservation, LLC at (860) 974-3448 or preservation1@mindspring.com.


Frederick Belden House (1855)
75 East Avenue
Norwalk

Available: An architectural gem in a very desirable business location facing west on the Norwalk Green.  Building may accommodate 1st floor commercial use and 3- bedroom apartment on the 2nd floor with a total of 5,492 sq ft finished area.  There is on-site parking for 14 cars with additional street parking along Bettswood available.  This historic building was most recently used as a funeral parlor. Potential alternate uses include attorney, CPA, and doctor’s offices plus residential uses.  Listed as the “Frederick Belden House” on the National Register of Historic Places, it is a contributing resource in the Norwalk Green Historic District.  Restoration/rehabilitation of the property may qualify for state or federal tax credits.

Contact: Ray Rumer (203) 899-3230 or rayrumer@bhhsNE.com. Listing details can be found at Prudential's website.

Submissions for the November-December 2013 issue must be received by Friday, October 25, 2013.

HPX: May/ June 2013

Historic Properties Exchange
May – June 2013


TWO OPPORTUNITIES IN SOUTH WINDSOR


1146 Main Street (c.1850)
South Windsor


Currently under threat of demolition, this property is available for consideration with the option of rehabilitation on site or relocation (preferably within the Windsor Farms district).  The Town of South Windsor's Demolition Delay Committee (DDC) voted to delay approval of a demolition permit for 1146 Main Street and agreed to work with the home's owners to reach a mutually agreeable solution that would preserve the structure.

The handsome Greek Revival house is framed by corner pilasters and a pedimented gable that make it a shorthand version of an ancient Greek temple. The chunky, square moldings give it strong geometry and a dignified presence on the street. It is currently a multi-family dwelling with 5 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms in approximately 2,490 total square feet.  Photos show a side porch which may no longer exist.

An excerpt of the statement of significance of the Windsor Farms Historic District as noted in the National Register nomination:
The Windsor Farms Historic District, the historic center of South Windsor, is a well preserved, rural-residential community of great historic significance. It is one of the few farming villages remaining in Connecticut still devoted to tobacco agriculture.  Unlike the more typical historic rural areas of the state where the historic components are widely scattered, the Windsor Farms Historic District is a highly concentrated, cohesive entity. Not only does it contain a significant group of farmhouses, barns, and other specialized buildings related to tobacco agriculture, it also encompasses approximately 1,500 acres of contiguous historic farmland which has been under intensive cultivation for more than 300 years. In addition to the more than 50 tobacco barns or sheds, the district contains well-preserved examples of major domestic building types and styles dating from 1694 to 1930, including a particularly fine, representative group of nineteenth-century houses built in the Greek Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne, and Colonial Revival styles.

A Connecticut Trust Circuit Rider is working to gather some of critical information about the condition of the house and the possible cost of remediation.  In the meantime, the DDC asks for assistance in identifying individuals or organizations that might have an interest in rehabilitation of the house.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org.

John Watson House (1788)
1876 Main Street
South Windsor

Former bed and breakfast (9 bedrooms, 8 full bathrooms) located in the East Windsor Hill historic district is available for purchase. Master builder Thomas Hayden designed and built this three-story mansion for John Watson, a prominent merchant. Description of the property from the National Register of Historic Places nomination:

Sited prominently at the northeast corner of Main Street and Sullivan Road, this three-story, wood-frame Georgian/Federal-Style mansion is a commanding presence. The heavy modillions under the eaves and the massiveness of the house contrast with the delicacy of the pedimented entranceway and the classical treatment of the central facade bay with its tripartite windows. A remarkable feature of this house is the use of a formal entrance on all four elevations. They are virtually identical with a pediment and fanlight, although only the main doorway has sidelights.

To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov and search East Windsor Hill Historic District, South Windsor, Connecticut.  Outbuildings on the site: carriage house, garage and outhouse.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org.


Submissions for the July-August 2013 issue must be received by Friday, June 21, 2013.

HPX: March/ April 2013

Historic Properties Exchange
March - April 2013


John Watson House (1788)
1876 Main Street
South Windsor

Former bed and breakfast (9 bedrooms, 8 full bathrooms) located in the East Windsor Hill historic district is available for purchase. Master builder Thomas Hayden designed and built this three-story mansion for John Watson, a prominent merchant. Description of the property from the National Register of Historic Places nomination:

Sited prominently at the northeast corner of Main Street and Sullivan Road, this three-story, wood-frame Georgian/Federal-Style mansion is a commanding presence. The heavy modillions under the eaves and the massiveness of the house contrast with the delicacy of the pedimented entranceway and the classical treatment of the central facade bay with its tripartite windows. A remarkable feature of this house is the use of a formal entrance on all four elevations. They are virtually identical with a pediment and fanlight, although only the main doorway has sidelights.

To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov and search East Windsor Hill Historic District, South Windsor, Connecticut.  Outbuildings on the site: carriage house, garage and outhouse.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org


Southford Chapel (c. 1830)
19 Strongtown Road (intersection of Rt. 67 & 188)
Southbury 

A demolition request was filed for this structure in December 19, 2012 and is nearing the end of its 90-day delay of demolition period.  Historically known as “Union Church” the Southford Chapel is one of the most significant buildings in Southford, according to Mary McCahon in the State of Connecticut Historic Resources Inventory. “Standing at a major crossroad in the former industrial village, the church is one of a handful of buildings that convey the sense of community now that the mills and factories that stimulated development of the area have disappeared.”

Contact: Baldwin Realty LLC of 331 B, Heritage Village, Southbury, Connecticut 06488 or Deloris Curtis, Southbury Planning Department, planning@southbury-ct.gov.
   

Lighthouse Inn (1902)
6 Guthrie Place
New London 

After sitting vacant for four years, Lighthouse Inn Resort in New London is available for purchase and restoration.  On Tuesday, March 19, CBRE Auction Services will present the inn for online auction opening bids at $500,000. The beautiful Lighthouse Inn is a historic, 100+year old former estate located on Long Island Sound. The Mission style inn was designed by renowned architect William R. Emerson to be the summer residence of steel magnate Charles S. Guthrie.  Original landscaping at the inn was designed by Olmsted Brothers, of Brookline, Massachusetts. About 25 years after its construction, the property became a popular seaside hotel boasting 51 guest rooms, restaurant and other amenities; it was formerly one of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Historic Hotels of America.
This property, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, may be eligible for historic preservation tax credits.  To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov  and search Lighthouse Inn, New London, Connecticut.  For more information about the auction, go to:  http://www.loopnet.com/Listing/18026294/6-GUTHRIE-PLACE-New-London-CT/ .

14 Sturtevant Ave
Norwich, CT 06360


Foreclosure property being sold “as is.” Spacious two-family home in decent condition boasting a finished attic and unique Victorian features. Seller may contribute up to 3% towards owner occupied buyers closing costs. Built in 1901, and located in the Chelsea Parade National Register district, the house may qualify for historic preservation tax credits.  For more information, go to: http://www.coldwellbankermoves.com/property/details/3162252/MLS-M9136453/14-Sturtevant-Ave-Norwich-CT-06360.aspx.
51 Greene Ave
Norwich, CT 06360
This 1890 Victorian multi-family home is located within walking distance to downtown. Located in the Chelsea Parade National Register district, the house may qualify for historic preservation tax credits.  For more information, go to: http://www.coldwellbankermoves.com/property/details/3330549/MLS-E263786/51-Greene-Ave-Norwich-CT-06360.aspx.
80 Asylum St
Norwich, CT 06360
Extra large, c. 1860 multi-family residence is available for purchase and rehabilitation. Building Code violations need to be addressed.  Sale is “as is” with no junk removal or repairs to be done by seller. For more information, go to: http://www.coldwellbankermoves.com/property/details/3258274/MLS-E262311/80-Asylum-St-Norwich-CT-06360.aspx.


Submissions for the March- April 2013 issue must be received by Friday, April 26, 2013.

HPX: January/ February 2013

Historic Properties Exchange
January – February 2013


Andrews-Olney House (c. 1800)
Southington

Currently owned by the Southington YMCA and under temporary injunction preventing demolition until January 2013, the Andrews-Olney House on North Main Street is available for purchase and rehabilitation. The property is located in the Southington Center National Register District and identified as a contributing resource. It offers an opportunity for residential or commercial uses. Non-profit organizations interested in the property may qualify for pre-development planning grants from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and restoration funds from the State Historic Preservation Office/Department of Economic and Community Development.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider, (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org


John Watson House (1788)
1876 Main Street

Former bed and breakfast (9 bedrooms, 8 full bathrooms) located in the East Windsor Hill historic district is available for purchase. Thomas Hayden designed and built this three-story mansion for John Watson, a prominent merchant. Description of the property from the National Register of Historic Places nomination:

Sited prominently at the northeast corner of Main Street and Sullivan Road, this three-story, wood-frame Georgian/Federal-Style mansion is a commanding presence. The heavy modillions under the eaves and the massiveness of the house contrast with the delicacy of the pedimented entranceway and the classical treatment of the central facade bay with its tripartite windows. A remarkable feature of this house is the use of a formal entrance on all four elevations. They are virtually identical with a pediment and fanlight, although only the main doorway has sidelights.

To view the complete nomination, go to http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov and search East Windsor Hill Historic District, South Windsor, Connecticut.  Outbuildings on the site: carriage house, garage and outhouse.

Contact: Gregory Farmer, Connecticut Circuit Rider (203) 464-7380 or circuitrider@cttrust.org


Gideon Seeley House (ca. 1812)
Brookfield

This early 19th century vernacular cottage was owned by several of Brookfield's prominent families and has been occupied throughout its history. It has had some additions over the years including architectural details that date from the Victorian period on both the interior and exterior. It measures approximately 1,825 square feet and is available for relocation and rehabilitation to interested parties.

Contact:  Jacqueline A. Salame, AIA
(203) 775-2538
tourdeforcedesigns@charter.net


Cohanzie School (1923)
40, 44, 48 Dayton Road
Waterford

Last call for proposals to rehabilitate the former Cohanzie School in Waterford.  Designed by local architect Louis H. Goddard and contractor Joseph A. St. Germain in 1923, the school on its 11-acre site was added to the Connecticut State Register of Historic Places in June 2012 making it a candidate for possible tax credits and grants.  Located near the Crystal Mall.

Contact: Robert N. Nye, Town Clerk & Municipal Historian (860) 444-5829 or clerk@waterfordct.org


Memorial Boulevard School
Bristol 

The City of Bristol is accepting sealed responses related to the reuse of the property known as Memorial Boulevard Middle School. Sealed responses will be accepted by the Purchasing Department, on behalf of the Real Estate Committee of the City Council, until February 1, 2013 at 1:00 pm. The City reserves the right to waive informalities in proposals, and to accept any or all proposals, if in its judgment the best interests of the City will be served. Further information can be obtained online at the website below.

Contact:  The City of Bristol
Purchasing Department
111 North Main Street
Bristol, CT 06010
     Tel (860) 584-6195, Fax (860) 584-6171
     http://www.bristolct.gov/bids, http://www.ci.bristol.ct.us/DocumentCenter/View/1333


Curtiss Farms barn
Plantsville/Southington 

Barn available for dismantling and removal from the property.  See listing in the Historic Barns of Connecticut statewide survey at http://www.connecticutbarns.org/index.cgi/52393.

Contact: Bill Curtiss (518) 439-3921, wcurtiss@aol.com, or Scott Curtiss (860)302-0314, SACurtiss@cox.net

Submissions for the March- April 2013 issue must be received by Friday, February 22, 2013.

Historic Properties Exchange

Historic Properties Exchange is published to advertise endangered historic properties in Connecticut by the Connecticut Trust, a statewide nonprofit organization located at 940 Whitney Avenue, Hamden, CT 06517.  Real Estate advertised is subject to the Federal Housing Act of 1968. Neither advertisers nor the Connecticut Trust are responsible or liable for any misinformation, misprints, or typographical errors contained in Historic Properties Exchange

To list a property, to learn more about the properties listed, or to subscribe to Connecticut Preservation News contact Jane Montanaro, Preservation Services Officer at jmontanaro@cttrust.org or 203-562-6312.


Historic Properties Exchange is supported by a generous grant from Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects.


Smith-Curtiss House, Derby, and Worthen Property, Granby

The Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) would like to announce that the Request for Proposals for the Smith-Curtiss property in Derby and the Worthen property in Granby will be available beginning April 1, 2011, at www.ct.gov/dep/residentcurator.

The Smith-Curtiss house, a classic saltbox built between 1740 and 1780, with additions in mid-19th century and early 20th century, is located in Osbornedale State Park in Derby. The house is approximately 2,300 sq. ft. with a detached two-car garage.

The Worthen property, a cape-style house built circa 1820 with later additions, is located in Enders State Forest in Granby. It is approximately 2,650 sq. ft. with a detached 1,300 sq ft. barn/guesthouse.

The Resident Curator Program invites individuals, families, businesses, and nonprofit organizations to apply for a long-term lease in one of these historic homes. In lieu of rent, the Resident Curator funds the restoration and the routine maintenance of the home and is required to provide public programming on the property that enhances visitor experiences while in the park or forest. The Resident Curator Program is modeled after similar successful ventures in Massachusetts, Maryland, and Delaware state parks, where historic structures, parks, and the public have benefited from restoration of these properties. Resident curators have the unique opportunity to live in a state park or forest and to play a key role in the preservation of state and local history.

The Request for Proposals will be available for free download on the website: www.ct.gov/dep/residentcurator.

Contact: Nicole Chalfant, nicole.chalfant@ct.gov or (860) 424-3179.